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Do all adjectives + ly become adverb?



 
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Do all adjectives + ly become adverb? #1 (permalink) Tue Jan 02, 2007 13:12 pm   Do all adjectives + ly become adverb?
 

Hi teachers,

Please see the following:

quick (adj) + ly ...> quickly (adv)
beautiful (adj) + ly ...> beautifully (adv)

Can I say: unaware (adj) + ly ...> unawarely (adv)?

Do all adjectives plus the suffix "-ly" become adverb?
If not, is there any rule to cope with it?

Thanks in advance

Jupiter
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Do all adjectives + ly become adverb? #2 (permalink) Tue Jan 02, 2007 13:58 pm   Do all adjectives + ly become adverb?
 

Hi

The rules

Using Adverbs

Adverbs modify verbs. They tell you How something is done.

Example: How does he she sing? - She sings beautifully.

Rule: Adverbs are often formed by adding -ly to an adjective

Example: beautiful - beautifully, careful - carefully

Be Careful!

* Some adjectives don't change in the adverb form. The most important of these are: fast - fast, hard - hard
* Good is probably the most important exception. The adverb form of 'good' is 'well'. Unfortunately, this is a common mistake that many Americans make! (please don?t shoot me American forum users ; ) )

NOT!!: He plays tennis good.

Quite basic but there are no real complex or extensive rules.

You can not really use unawarely; depending on the core meaning you could use consciously with aware in the sentence. But aware is somewhere between this word and knowledge.

e.g.
He was consciously aware of his limitations in learning a new langauge.
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Do all adjectives + ly become adverb? #3 (permalink) Tue Jan 02, 2007 14:44 pm   Do all adjectives + ly become adverb?
 

Hi Jupiter

Saying that "the addition of -ly to an adjective turns the adjective into an adverb" is a good, basic rule that works most of the time. As Stew noted, there are exceptions, though.

Here are a couple more notes about adverbs:

- Adverbs also modify adjectives (consciously aware is an example of this).
- Adverbs can also modify other adverbs (example: relatively often)
- A few adjectives end in -ly and therefore there is no "typical" adverb form for them:
adjective: friendly
adverb: in a friendly way

- And keep in mind that there are quite a number of adverbs that do not end in -ly. (For example: sometimes, not, quite)

There is nothing "wrong" with turning the adjective unaware into the adverb unawarely. However I'd say unawarely would be used quite rarely.

Amy
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Do all adjectives + ly become adverb? #4 (permalink) Tue Jan 02, 2007 18:02 pm   Do all adjectives + ly become adverb?
 

jupiter wrote:
Can I say: unaware (adj) + ly ...> unawarely (adv)?

As a small addition to what Amy and Stew have already said, there is another adverb sometimes used in the sense of 'without noticing/being noticed', which is 'unawares'. It is used especially with verbs like 'take' or 'catch': to take someone unawares.
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Do all adjectives + ly become adverb? #5 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 3:36 am   Do all adjectives + ly become adverb?
 

Hi

Thanks for your answer.

The following is my personal rule:

1/ Adjective + ly = Adverb (but some are rarely used)
2/ If adjective ends in ly, we can't add -ly at all.
3/ Some adverbs don't end in -ly.

Is my rule OK?

Jupiter
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Do all adjectives + ly become adverb? #6 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 7:54 am   Do all adjectives + ly become adverb?
 

.
I may use that one myself, Jupiter. Your rule is eminently practical.
.
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Do all adjectives + ly become adverb? #7 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 18:51 pm   Do all adjectives + ly become adverb?
 

...and FYI, cannot is one word. This is my current campaign.

It's been said that if you are vehement, you could write it as two words and italicize "not". But traditionally, it is one word.

Regarding the good/well distinction in America:

when we're being formal, we'll use them correctly.

If someone asks me "How're you doing?" as I'm strolling down the sidewalk, I might respond, "Good."

hehe

That's right, I do good... good deeds!
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