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Farther objection vs. Further objection



 
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #1 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 16:47 pm   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

Hi

I know (theoretically :)) that in some contexts further and farther are synonymous. The only little problem is to determine, in which ones. :)

Could you give your preference to one of the phrases:

He made no farther objection.
vs
He made no further objection.

or provide some explanation for the difference in meaning/emphasis (if any)?
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #2 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 17:47 pm   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

further

Farther = distance

Further = figurative meaning

That's how I learned the difference, anyway.
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #3 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 17:57 pm   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

Our relationship cannot go further. = Our relationship is essentially over, or at least its growth has ended.

It's farther to Waco than it is to Austin. = Waco is farther away (distance) than Austin.
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #4 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 18:24 pm   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

prezbucky wrote:
its growth has ended.

Much more poetic than 'we're through', that's for sure!
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #5 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 18:26 pm   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

hehe

"Talk to the hand, ex-girlfriend!"
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #6 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 21:47 pm   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

Hi Conchita, Tamara and Tom. :D

To be more precise, further is used in reference to time or quantity

I vote for:

Ex.He made no further objection. :wink:
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #7 (permalink) Wed Jan 03, 2007 22:39 pm   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

yep
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #8 (permalink) Thu Jan 04, 2007 4:57 am   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

.
Many grammars put 'farther' and 'further' on a par for physical distances, with 'further' still demanded for time, quantity and figurative distances. The two words are historically the same, and have suffered much at the hands of prescriptivists over the years. Webster notes that " 'further' has squeezed 'farther' out of the 'additional' sense and is giving it considerable pressure in the 'more distant' sense."
.
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #9 (permalink) Thu Jan 04, 2007 5:33 am   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

Mister Micawber wrote:
.
Many grammars put 'farther' and 'further' on a par..."
.

...sorry, but is it a typo? Was it meant to be grammarians?

Tom
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #10 (permalink) Thu Jan 04, 2007 9:42 am   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

Thanks to you all!

further, OK.
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Farther objection vs. Further objection #11 (permalink) Thu Jan 04, 2007 13:53 pm   Farther objection vs. Further objection
 

Tom wrote:
Mister Micawber wrote:
.
Many grammars put 'farther' and 'further' on a par..."
.

...sorry, but is it a typo? Was it meant to be grammarians?

Tom
Hi Tom

You might look at the word "grammars" as different systems of explaining/prescribing grammar.

Grammarian

Amy
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