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"have been able" vs "want"



 
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"have been able" vs "want" #1 (permalink) Mon Jan 15, 2007 17:14 pm   "have been able" vs "want"
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #73 "Modal Medley", question 3

It's quite clear that you ......... to visit their house, so why don't you?

(a) have been able
(b) may
(c) want

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #73 "Modal Medley", answer 3

It's quite clear that you want to visit their house, so why don't you?

Correct answer: (c) want
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please explain why i can't use have been able

thank you
Kerman
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"have been able" vs "want" #2 (permalink) Mon Jan 15, 2007 20:01 pm   "have been able" vs "want"
 

Hi Kerman

The main problem is that the simple present tense question at the end ("so why don't you?") doesn't make much sense in combination with the statement that is made in the present perfect tense ("have been able"). A logical follow-up question would have been "so why haven't you?", for example. With additional context, you might be able to justify mixing the tenses in this sentence, but there is no other context provided.

The correct sentence is completely in the simple present tense and makes sense even without additional context:
"It's quite clear that you want to visit their house, so why don't you (visit)?"

Amy
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"have been able" vs "want" #3 (permalink) Fri Sep 16, 2011 20:46 pm   "have been able" vs "want"
 

Hello Amy,

I think the sentence what you explained, disappeared. I would be very curious what was this sentence that you explained to us. So your explanation would be clearer for us.

Many thanks:
Kati Svaby
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"have been able" vs "want" #4 (permalink) Fri Sep 16, 2011 21:14 pm   "have been able" vs "want"
 

The sentence that Amy was explaining was in the first message:
It's quite clear that you want to visit their house, so why don't you?
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"have been able" vs "want" #5 (permalink) Fri Sep 16, 2011 21:33 pm   "have been able" vs "want"
 

Hello Bez,

Many thanks. Okay, I understand.
Regards:
Kati
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Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
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Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 6286
Location: Hungary

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