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meaning of "...linked by the stormy weather"



 
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meaning of "...linked by the stormy weather" #1 (permalink) Fri Jan 19, 2007 7:41 am   meaning of "...linked by the stormy weather"
 

Hi!

This morning I heard the following sentence:

Twelfe people died in accidents linked by the stormy weather.

As I only came across the link in PC?s only I have the idea of link as a dependant connection. Now, is it usual to speak about "links" in daily life and is my idea of it correct?

Michael
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meaning of "...linked by the stormy weather" #2 (permalink) Fri Jan 19, 2007 10:45 am   meaning of "...linked by the stormy weather"
 

Twelve people died in accidents linked to (the) stormy weather.

Here 'linked to' means 'in connection with'. In other words: the accidents were caused by (the) stormy weather
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...linked by the stormy weather #3 (permalink) Fri Jan 19, 2007 11:04 am   ...linked by the stormy weather
 

Fan of Arabian horses wrote:
Now, is it usual to speak about "links" in daily life?

Yes, I'd say 'link' is quite a common word. A usual collocation is 'strong links', as between people and countries, that is, things that firmly connect them.

Used as a verb, 'link' has the same sense of 'join': they were walking down the street with linked arms; the facts are closely linked; they linked up with their associates in Rome.
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