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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?


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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #16 (permalink) Fri Jul 08, 2011 19:38 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

Just a comment on American vs British usage:

The use of 'make it up' in the test sentence does NOT sound natural to my American ears. In North America, I would expect the word 'it' to be omitted in such a context:

- After they had shouted at each other, they decided to make up. (This sounds natural to me.)
- After they had shouted at each other, they decided to make it up.

The use of 'it' in the second of the two sentences above sounds completely foreign to me. However, I might use 'make it up' this way:

- After having inadvertently broken her favorite vase, he tried to make it up to her by sending a beautiful new vase along with a dozen roses.

The word 'it' refers to the fact that he broke her favorite vase.

Alan wrote:
There is also another meaning of 'make up', suggesting 'invent' 'create'.
That's right. And I can easily imagine people using 'make it up' with that meaning:

- Was that a true story, or did you just make it up?
.
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #17 (permalink) Fri Jul 08, 2011 19:43 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

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Of course you can say: They decided to make up or They decided to make it up. It very much depends on what you are referring to and what the situation is. 'Make it up' would be used for something formal like two countries/two political parties. 'Make up' would be informal between individuals.

Alan
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #18 (permalink) Fri Jul 08, 2011 19:51 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

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Thanks Bez,

I can't say anything else that thanks God and we are lucky that at the present time we are not undergraduate students, aren't we?
Are these words correct and existing yet when we speak about exams?
-repeat exam
-resit
-retake
Many thanks because the dictionaries give unambiguous answers.

Kati
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #19 (permalink) Fri Jul 08, 2011 19:55 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

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Hi Kati,

I think 'reset' is for the examiner to do and 'resit' would be for the student.

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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #20 (permalink) Fri Jul 08, 2011 21:23 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

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Hello Alan,

The typos are my death. Of course I wanted to write resit/ retake= (the exam or a test again, usually after failing in the first time.)

My question would be what is the name of the exam that I have to postpone without failing, say, because of illness.

This would be: the make up=(but Oxford Dictionary says it's a special exam taken by the students who missed or failed the earlier one. Oxford Dictionary doesn't say this is a postponed exam. In Hungarian there are two words one who fails: this is repeat exam
and the other who can't take exam on a given day : this is a postponed exam.

Postpone exam: you have not got a bad note in your registration book
Repeat exam: you have a bad note and you are only allowed one resit.

Can we use alternatively resit/retake/make up?

Many thanks and best regards:
Kati Svaby
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #21 (permalink) Fri Jul 08, 2011 21:39 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

Yankee wrote:
Just a comment on American vs British usage:

The use of 'make it up' in the test sentence does NOT sound natural to my American ears. In North America, I would expect the word 'it' to be omitted in such a context:

It's not a US v Brit usage thing, because I agree - and you can see that in my response (message #11) after I quote the original phrases, when I was making my point I used 'make up' rather than 'make it up'.
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #22 (permalink) Fri Jul 08, 2011 21:54 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

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Hello Yankee,

Who chose the British English they meet the expression:
-make it up with somebody (Br.E.)
-make up with somebody(AmE)
Examples:
-Why don't you make up with you boy friend ?
-Has he made it up with her yet?
-Have they made it up with their parents?

Both means to end a disagreement with somebody and become friends again.
I like both and I think we have to respect both ! Each has its own tradition, hasn't it?

Regards:
Kati Svaby
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #23 (permalink) Fri Jul 08, 2011 22:49 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

Kati Svaby wrote:
Examples:
-Why don't you make up with you boy friend ?
-Has he made it up with her yet?
-Have they made it up with their parents?

Hi Kati,

Yes, the use of 'make it up with somebody' in your examples sounds completely unnatural and wrong to my American ear. Before today, if one of my students had used 'make it up with somebody', I would have told that student that the inclusion of 'it' was wrong!

Although I've become familiar with quite a few of the differences between BrE and AmE, I don't know all of them. At any rate, that's why I pointed out that this seems to be another one of those unexpected little differences between AmE and BrE.
Kati Svaby wrote:
-make it up with somebody (Br.E.)
-make up with somebody(AmE)

By the way, from what I have gathered here in this thread, my assumption now is that 'make up with somebody' is used in BOTH AmE and BrE, but that 'make it up with somebody' is basically a British usage.

Perhaps Beeesneees or Alan or Dozy will comment on that.
.
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #24 (permalink) Sat Jul 09, 2011 9:49 am   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

Kati Svaby wrote:
Hello Yankee,

Who chose the British English they meet the expression:
-make it up with somebody (Br.E.)
-make up with somebody(AmE)

That's not right, Kati!

make up with somebody (Br.E and AmE)

they decided to make it up
they made it up
seems to be Br.E from what Yankee is saying, and 'it' here refers to their friendship. No 'with...' following it. However use of 'it' is far less common than usage without it.

If my British ears were asked about these:
They argued years ago but have now made up.
They argued years ago but have now made it up.
they would both sound acceptable. (it = their previous relationship)

However, if I were asked about these:
He argued with his girlfriend but he has now made up with her.
He argued with his girlfriend but he has now made it up with her.
the second does NOT sound as natural.
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #25 (permalink) Sun Jul 10, 2011 23:44 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

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Hello Bez,

I have to say that what I write I always control in the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary by A S Hornby (Eigth edition)

here it is:
make up (with sb)
(BrE. also): make it up (with sb)

to end a disagreement with sb and become friends again

-Why don't you two kiss and make up?
-Has he made it up with her yet?
-Have they made it up yet?
(on 932. page)

Regards:
Kati
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #26 (permalink) Mon Jul 11, 2011 6:49 am   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

In your earlier post you indicated that 'make up' was AmE only. That's what I was disagreeing with.
What you say in your latest post agrees with what I wrote above it.
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #27 (permalink) Sun Sep 02, 2012 15:05 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

Beeesneees,
1. What you say in your latest post agrees with what I wrote above it.
2. What you say in your latest post agrees with what I wrote it above.
Are these sentences OK? Do they mean the same?
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What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"? #28 (permalink) Sun Sep 02, 2012 17:02 pm   What does this phrasal verb mean: "Make it up"?
 

1 is obviously okay to me, as I used it.
2 is incorrect.
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