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make an effort vs. make a start



 
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make an effort vs. make a start #1 (permalink) Thu Mar 29, 2007 9:00 am   make an effort vs. make a start
 

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #24 "Idioms with phrasal verbs", question 4

My advice is to stop worrying about it and put your best foot forward.

(a) make a step
(b) make an effort
(c) make a start
(d) make a try

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #24 "Idioms with phrasal verbs", answer 4

My advice is to stop worrying about it and make an effort.

Correct answer: (b) make an effort
_________________________

why not "make a start"?

Kirijji
Kirijji
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make an effort vs. make a start #2 (permalink) Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:38 am   make an effort vs. make a start
 

Hi Kirijji

The only meaning I'm familiar with for 'put your best foot forward' is 'try hard to do your best (usually in order to make a good impression)'. The choice that is closest to the meaning as I know it is 'make an effort'.

However, according to online sources, the idiom apparently has several meanings. Here is one link:
http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/put+best+foot+forward

Amy
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