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roll vs walk



 
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
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roll vs walk #1 (permalink) Wed Aug 29, 2007 3:04 am   roll vs walk
 

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #29 "Letter Writing (1)", question 7

The first time I tried to use it, your lawnmower simply ......... over the grass but did not cut it.

(a) walked
(b) rolled
(c) strode
(d) tripped

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #29 "Letter Writing (1)", answer 7

The first time I tried to use it, your lawnmower simply rolled over the grass but did not cut it.

Correct answer: (b) rolled
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Why is not walked?

Homo
Homo
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roll vs walk #2 (permalink) Wed Aug 29, 2007 8:31 am   roll vs walk
 

'Walked' means use your feet to continue and so can't be used for a machine.

Alan
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