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Difference between loose and lose



 
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Own vs. possess | Equally necessary is it
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Difference between loose and lose #1 (permalink) Wed Jan 12, 2005 23:02 pm   Difference between loose and lose
 

Test No. incompl/inter-4 "Easy Questions", question 9

One of that child's teeth is very ......... and will soon fall out.

(a) lost
(b) losing
(c) lose
(d) loose

Test No. incompl/inter-4 "Easy Questions", answer 9

One of that child's teeth is very loose and will soon fall out.

Correct answer: (d) loose

Your answer was: incorrect
One of that child's teeth is very lose and will soon fall out.
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why do you chose loose
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LOSE/LOOSE #2 (permalink) Wed Jan 12, 2005 23:21 pm   LOSE/LOOSE
 

Hi,

The word LOSE is a verb - the word LOOSE is an adjective. So you have a sentence like this: If your tooth is LOOSE, you will probably LOSE it.
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Re: LOSE/LOOSE #3 (permalink) Sun May 22, 2011 14:13 pm   Re: LOSE/LOOSE
 

but how about the adjective lost?
Joven20005
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Difference between loose and lose #4 (permalink) Sun May 22, 2011 14:22 pm   Difference between loose and lose
 

Hi,

'Lost' is the past participle of the verb 'lose', which can be used as an adjective. You sometimes see notices about dogs/cats that have gone missing. They are often headed: Lost cat/dog.

Alan
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Re: LOSE/LOOSE #5 (permalink) Sat Dec 31, 2011 18:42 pm   Re: LOSE/LOOSE
 

For me was a tricky question. But with this explication, im totally sure that i understood the question.

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