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unforeseen
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"what for" vs "for what"



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
first/second year student vs. in his/her first/second year | Expressing reconsideration at the end of a sentence.
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"what for" vs "for what" #1 (permalink) Mon Jan 07, 2008 10:53 am   "what for" vs "for what"
 

Could you tell me what a difference is between what for and for what?

One more thing, Can u tell me which situation should goes with "what for", which goes with "for what"?

thank you
Dayjung
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Joined: 07 Jan 2008
Posts: 5

"what for" vs "for what" #2 (permalink) Mon Jan 07, 2008 21:15 pm   "what for" vs "for what"
 

"What for?" is usually a standalone sentence/question used to express interest in knowing the reasoning behind some action.
"for what" can be used in more complex sentences. You can check out some examples here.
Thanos
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Joined: 08 Dec 2007
Posts: 12

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