Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
transgression; desecration; attack or disruption; rape
saw
work
violation
slogan
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Phrase "Are you going to wait any longer"



 
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Fall asleep - slumber? | Meaning of "over the cracks"
listening exercises
Message
Author
Phrase "Are you going to wait any longer" #1 (permalink) Thu Jan 10, 2008 16:55 pm   Phrase "Are you going to wait any longer"
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #54 "Chit Chat: At the bus stop", question 9

Mike: Oh dear. Are you going to wait any ..........

(a) quicker
(b) slower
(c) former
(d) longer

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #54 "Chit Chat: At the bus stop", answer 9

Mike: Oh dear. Are you going to wait any longer.

Correct answer: (d) longer

Your answer was: incorrect
Mike: Oh dear. Are you going to wait any former.
_________________________

what is the meaning of this sentence?

Folsy
Folsy
Guest





Phrase "Are you going to wait any longer" #2 (permalink) Fri Jan 11, 2008 6:52 am   Phrase "Are you going to wait any longer"
 

.
It seems straightforward to me, Folsy. The speaker is asking the other person whether s/he will wait longer for the occurrence of some event.
.
_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13018

Do you know how to use the relative pronoun?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Here is how you can learn English the fun way! Click to subscribe to free email English course
Any longer vs for long #3 (permalink) Thu Sep 29, 2011 13:18 pm   Any longer vs for long
 

Hi
Mike: Oh dear. Are you going to wait any longer

I just want to know whether i can use for a long instead of any longer.
And, what happens if i don't use any (i.e. Mike: Oh dear. Are you going to wait longer)
why emphasis is given on any

Thanks in advance
R J Solanki
New Member


Joined: 23 Sep 2011
Posts: 8

Phrase "Are you going to wait any longer" #4 (permalink) Thu Sep 29, 2011 13:29 pm   Phrase "Are you going to wait any longer"
 

I just want to know whether i can use for a long instead of any longer.-- No, you cannot.

And, what happens if i don't use any (i.e. Mike: Oh dear. Are you going to wait longer)-- That is OK, but not quite the native choice.

why emphasis is given on any? -- 'Any' is not really emphasis. It is more like a traditional collocation, I think, like these:

Do you want any more soup?
Yes, I'll have some more, please.
Are you any thinner now since you started dieting?
Some ice cream is always nice for dessert.


'Any' and 'some' are not grammatically required in any of those sentences, but it in normal practice to use them.
_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13018

test question #5 (permalink) Thu Sep 29, 2011 14:00 pm   test question
 

Thanks i want to know that i have received test question (TEST1) through e-mail but i am not receiving any other test question. Can you help me why such thing happens???
R J Solanki
New Member


Joined: 23 Sep 2011
Posts: 8

Phrase "Are you going to wait any longer" #6 (permalink) Thu Sep 29, 2011 14:21 pm   Phrase "Are you going to wait any longer"
 

Please post such problems in the Feedback, Comments and Suggestions forum.
_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13018

Display posts from previous:   
Fall asleep - slumber? | Meaning of "over the cracks"
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
redundancyRight just one morewhat is the difference?What does 'bring forward' mean?Meaning of "bring off""come up with" vs "come across"holding meetings and delivering papersCould OR can?The meaning of the verb "to come by"Meaning of 'znooze'Why don't we use will or could?Commence vs. StartCan vs. be able to

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail