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'any tea' vs 'some tea'



 
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'any tea' vs 'some tea' #1 (permalink) Wed Feb 06, 2008 20:48 pm   'any tea' vs 'some tea'
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #99 "a, some or any", question 5

I haven't got ......... tea. Can you go to the corner store and buy some more?

(a) a
(b) some
(c) any

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #99 "a, some or any", answer 5

I haven't got any tea. Can you go to the corner store and buy some more?

Correct answer: (c) any

Your answer was: incorrect
I haven't got some tea. Can you go to the corner store and buy some more?
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why any, not some? this is not interogative sentence.

thanks
gill from texas
gill from texas
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'any tea' vs 'some tea' #2 (permalink) Wed Feb 06, 2008 20:57 pm   'any tea' vs 'some tea'
 

Hi,

'Any' is usually used with questions and negative statements as in:

Question: Have you any idea where she's gone?

Answer: No, I haven't any idea at all.

Alan
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'any tea' vs 'some tea' #3 (permalink) Thu Feb 07, 2008 0:15 am   'any tea' vs 'some tea'
 

Hi Gill from Texas

Alan's sentences sound rather "British" to me. If you are learning English in Texas, this is the way you will most likely hear those same sentences:

Question: Do you have any idea where she went?

Answer: No, I don't have any idea at all.

As Alan has already mentioned, the word 'any' is used in both interrogative and negative sentences. You will also find the word 'any' in IF-sentences:

If you have any questions, feel free to ask.
.
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'any tea' vs 'some tea' #4 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 12:52 pm   'any tea' vs 'some tea'
 

the corner store= the store in the corner? the store at the corner? the store on the corner?
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'any tea' vs 'some tea' #5 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 13:57 pm   'any tea' vs 'some tea'
 

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Hi Saneta,

Probably 'at' or 'on' are best - both sides of the Atlantic! 'In' is too precise.

Alan
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'any tea' vs 'some tea' #6 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 15:08 pm   'any tea' vs 'some tea'
 

Thanks Alan! But I don't catch/grasp what you mean by ,,both sides of the Atlantic!'' connected with on/at the corner?...
Saneta
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'any tea' vs 'some tea' #7 (permalink) Sat Mar 14, 2009 15:20 pm   'any tea' vs 'some tea'
 

Saneta wrote:
Thanks Alan! But I don't catch/grasp what you mean by ,,both sides of the Atlantic!'' connected with on/at the corner?...

Both sides of the Atlantic: in both -- America and Britain (these countries are on the opposite sides of the Atlantic ocean).
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