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"come into work" vs "come in to work"



 
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"come into work" vs "come in to work" #1 (permalink) Tue Apr 01, 2008 14:08 pm   "come into work" vs "come in to work"
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #173 "Simple Present, Simple Past, Simple Future", question 1

The candidate ......... many voters when she ran for governor last year.

(a) impress
(b) impressed
(c) will impress

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #173 "Simple Present, Simple Past, Simple Future", answer 1

The candidate impressed many voters when she ran for governor last year.

Correct answer: (b) impressed
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Which is correct, "come into work" or "come in to work"?

Mirray
Mirray
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"come into work" vs "come in to work" #2 (permalink) Tue Apr 01, 2008 17:13 pm   "come into work" vs "come in to work"
 

Hi Mirray,

Code:
Which is correct, "come into work" or "come in to work"?

It depends where the speaker is. If you are asking someone at home to come to their/your place of work, you would say: Come into work if you are feeling all right or stay at home if you are unwell.

If you see someone in their/your place of work and you want to know if they intend to work, you would ask: Have you come in to work (have you come in (in order) to work?) or are you just visiting?

Alan
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"come into work" vs "come in to work" #3 (permalink) Tue Apr 01, 2008 18:10 pm   "come into work" vs "come in to work"
 

Alan wrote:
Have you come in to work (have you come in (in order) to work?) or are you just visiting?


Hello Alan,

I know it might sound stupid, but why not '... or you are just visiting?'

Best regards
SkiIucK
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 856

"come into work" vs "come in to work" #4 (permalink) Tue Apr 01, 2008 18:34 pm   "come into work" vs "come in to work"
 

Hi,

Quote:
'... or you are just visiting?'

sounds a bit unnatural to me.

Alan
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