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Difference between hear and listen to


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Difference between hear and listen to #1 (permalink) Thu Feb 24, 2005 16:25 pm   Difference between hear and listen to
 

Test No. incompl/elem-4 "Listen/Hear", question 5

I ......... to the concert every Monday on the radio and I imagine I am there listening to it in person.

(a) listen
(b) am listening
(c) hear
(d) am hearing

Test No. incompl/elem-4 "Listen/Hear", answer 5

I listen to the concert every Monday on the radio and I imagine I am there listening to it in person.

Correct answer: (a) listen

Your answer was: incorrect
I hear to the concert every Monday on the radio and I imagine I am there listening to it in person.
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What's the difference between "hear" and "listen" in this phrase: "I hear to the concert every Monday on the radio and I imagine I am there listening to it in person"?

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Hear/listen #2 (permalink) Thu Feb 24, 2005 18:03 pm   Hear/listen
 

If you hear something it is because you have ears and are not deaf. If you listen TO something then you are paying particular attention to what you can hear.
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Hear #3 (permalink) Wed Jul 13, 2005 9:21 am   Hear
 

The construction hear to is not possible. If you hear a concert, it is because you are near the sound of the music but you are not there in person and not paying attention to it in detail.
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Present continuous vs. present simple #4 (permalink) Sat Sep 10, 2005 13:10 pm   Present continuous vs. present simple
 

Answer 5

correct sentence:
I listen to the concert every Monday on the radio and I imagine I am there listening to it in person.

Correct answer: (a) listen

Your answer was: incorrect
your sentence:
I am listening to the concert every Monday on the radio and I imagine I am there listening to it in person.

I have learned we can use the present continuous to describe something we regularly do at a certain time.
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Present continuous vs. present simple #5 (permalink) Sat Sep 10, 2005 13:40 pm   Present continuous vs. present simple
 

Hi John,

I don't quite follow your comment: I am listening to some music usually means you are doing it now and is an actual as against a regular/repeated action.

Alan
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Present continuous vs. present simple #6 (permalink) Tue Sep 13, 2005 18:05 pm   Present continuous vs. present simple
 

In the Cambridge Advances Grammar in Use book it say: if we do something regularly at a certain time we can use the present continuous to describe it. e.g. At 8 o'clock I'm usually driving to work.
So could i say: I am always listening to the concert every monday on the radio?
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Present continuous #7 (permalink) Tue Sep 13, 2005 19:40 pm   Present continuous
 

Hi John,

This is becoming a little complicated. If you are talking about a regular/typical/repeated action, it is usual to use the Present Simple. So we have I frequently/always/often listen to the radio on Mondays. The example you quote from the grammar book describes the speaker imagining himself doing something at a specific time. The important word there is specific. As soon as you introduce an adverb such as always, which by its very meaning refers to a repeated action, the Present Simple becomes the preferred choice. And that is the case in my original sentence in Answer 5 (every Monday)

Alan
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Difference between hear and listen to #8 (permalink) Thu May 17, 2007 14:51 pm   Difference between hear and listen to
 

Is it always so, that we have to use the verb "to listen" with preposition?

Could you, please, give me another example, if possible, with a different prepositon?

Or is "to listen" always followed by "to"?
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Difference between hear and listen to #9 (permalink) Sat Jun 28, 2008 20:23 pm   Difference between hear and listen to
 

How much I study English more complicated it become.

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Hear/listen #10 (permalink) Sun Jun 29, 2008 11:22 am   Hear/listen
 

Hi Alan,

I am sorry for my post, I asked without understanding your reply properly. I am really embarassed.Please forgive me.
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Test #11 (permalink) Thu Jan 28, 2010 21:02 pm   Test
 

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Dear Torsten,

I understand the difference between " hear and listen to" in spite of this my score was 10:9 at the first attempt/5 was bad/ and after 7 days I repeated and my score was 10:8. Each time I committed grammar mistakes which are now became clear./5-10 were bad/
In the 9. test-question I didn't understand the expression:"...he is taking it all in ". Will you explain me its meaning.


Thank you in advance.

Have a good weekend:

Kati Svaby
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Difference between hear and listen to #12 (permalink) Mon Mar 15, 2010 15:53 pm   Difference between hear and listen to
 

I dont understand nothing! I dont know way???
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Correction #13 (permalink) Mon Mar 15, 2010 18:59 pm   Correction
 

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Correction!

I made "number-mistakes" in my previous letter.
Really I wanted to write, I understand the difference between "hear and listen to" in spite of this at my first attempt I made 5 mistakes, in the second one 2 and in the third 1.This last one is problematic to me.
I didn't understand the expression: He is talking it all in..Will you explain me.

Thanks in advance:
Kati Svaby
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Difference between hear and listen to #14 (permalink) Tue Jul 27, 2010 21:35 pm   Difference between hear and listen to
 

I don't understand anything
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Correction #15 (permalink) Tue Jul 27, 2010 21:43 pm   Correction
 

Kati Svaby wrote:
I didn't understand the expression: He is talking it all in..Will you explain me.

Thanks in advance:
Kati Svaby

He is taking it all in - this means he is listening carefully to what is being said and he will remember it all. (You might think of it as: He is taking all the information into his brain).
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