Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
judgmental; important; crucial; vital
main
confident
critical
small
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

complicate vs. complicated


Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
"Walking on the footpath" vs "Walking along the footpath" | I've drunk two cups of tea this morning. vs I drank two cups of tea this morning.
listening exercises
Message
Author
complicate vs. complicated #91 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 23:15 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Molly wrote:
Hm, that could say to one:

The deducer has limited knowledge of "complicate" in context.
The deducer is known for his prescriptionist approach to language use.
The deducer is determined not to be outdone by anyone.
The deducer is wrong.

No; it could only say to one that the deducer is unaware that "complicate" is an adjective.

All the best,

MrP
MrPedantic
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 1326
Location: Southern England

complicate vs. complicated #92 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 23:18 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

MrPedantic wrote:
No; it could only say to one that the deducer is unaware that "complicate" is an adjective.


Again, we're in that "things can only say what Mr P-astor says they can" territory.
Molly
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 4017

Do you know how to use the relative pronoun?English grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!How many different ways with words do you know? Subscribe to free email English course
complicate vs. complicated #93 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 23:27 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Molly wrote:
MrPedantic wrote:
No; it could only say to one that the deducer is unaware that "complicate" is an adjective.


Again, we're in that "things can only say what Mr P-astor says they can" territory.

You're welcome to explain your reasoning.

MrP
MrPedantic
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 1326
Location: Southern England

complicate vs. complicated #94 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 23:30 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

MrPedantic wrote:
You're welcome to explain your reasoning.

MrP

The reasoning is clear: don't trust that because you see a few typos in that text you can then state categorically that "complicate" is a typo there. Such deduction is based on air.
Molly
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 4017

complicate vs. complicated #95 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 23:41 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Molly wrote:
The reasoning is clear: don't trust that because you see a few typos in that text you can then state categorically that "complicate" is a typo there. Such deduction is based on air.

On the contrary. I'll make it easier to follow:

Quote:
1. Deductive method (you are unaware that "complicate" is an adjective)

In "complicate pricing mechanism", "complicate" has the function of an adjective.
"Complicate" is not an adjective.
"Complicate" is therefore an error.

Here, points 1 and 2 are assumed to be true. They therefore guarantee that "complicate" is an error.

MrP
MrPedantic
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 1326
Location: Southern England

complicate vs. complicated #96 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 23:44 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Quote:
On the contrary. I'll make it easier to follow:

Mr P, you're very easy to follow. You ain't no Einstein.

Quote:
Here, points 1 and 2 are assumed to be true.

By whom?
Molly
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 4017

complicate vs. complicated #97 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 23:45 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

By the person who is unaware that "complicate" is an adjective, of course.

MrP
MrPedantic
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 1326
Location: Southern England

complicate vs. complicated #98 (permalink) Sun Jun 08, 2008 23:48 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

MrPedantic wrote:
By the person who is unaware that "complicate" is an adjective, of course.

MrP

That person isn't you, of course. So, you're saying that "the person who is unaware that "complicate" is an adjective" thinks that the use of "complicate" in that text is an error, but in reality the rest of us cannot guarantee that it's an error until we speak to the writer, right?
Molly
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 4017

complicate vs. complicated #99 (permalink) Mon Jun 09, 2008 0:03 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

Molly wrote:
So, you're saying that "the person who is unaware that "complicate" is an adjective" thinks that the use of "complicate" in that text is an error,

Correct.

Molly wrote:
in reality the rest of us cannot guarantee that it's an error until we speak to the writer, right?

As I mentioned before:

MrPedantic wrote:
Thus although "complicate" is not technically impossible in your context (perhaps as a bizarre metaphor), it is inappropriate, in comparison with "complicated" (the "natural" choice; as the advertisers might say).


Or, in the fuller version:

MrPedantic wrote:
2. Inductive method (you are aware that "complicate" is an adjective)
In "complicate pricing mechanism", "complicate" has the function of an adjective.
"Complicate" (non-biological adj.) is rare; "complicated" (adj.) is common.
The contrast is with a "simple" pricing mechanism.
Awareness of "complicate" (non-biological adj.) implies a sophisticated awareness of English usage on the author's part.
There are typos and grammatical errors elsewhere in the text.
The text is not sophisticated.
"Complicate" is therefore an error for "complicated".

All the best,

MrP
MrPedantic
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 1326
Location: Southern England

complicate vs. complicated #100 (permalink) Mon Jun 09, 2008 8:13 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

Quote:
Thus although "complicate" is not technically impossible in your context (perhaps as a bizarre metaphor), it is inappropriate, in comparison with "complicated" (the "natural" choice; as the advertisers might say).

Hm, let's see...

Mr P has taken us on a journey down the garden path:

It's not the natural choice.
It's a typo because there are other typos in that text.
It may be the right choice for the writer, but if it was he/she should have marked that choice in some way for the readers.
Back to, "I think, it's a typo".

What a runaround.
Molly
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 4017

complicate vs. complicated #101 (permalink) Mon Jun 09, 2008 23:09 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Molly wrote:
Mr P has taken us on a journey down the garden path:

It's not the natural choice.
It's a typo because there are other typos in that text.
It may be the right choice for the writer, but if it was he/she should have marked that choice in some way for the readers.
Back to, "I think, it's a typo".


It's simple enough. To paraphrase:

Quote:
"Complicated" is the "natural choice" in the original example. It's also the "natural choice" in e.g. the "pricing mechanism" example presented by Molly, where "complicate" is a typo.

(The presence of other typos in the text increases the probability that "complicate" is a typo; moreover, a "good writer" according to Molly would have marked an intentional "complicate" in some way.)

MrP
MrPedantic
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 1326
Location: Southern England

complicate vs. complicated #102 (permalink) Mon Jun 09, 2008 23:17 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

"Complicated" is the "natural choice" in the original example. It's also the "natural choice" in e.g. the "pricing mechanism" example presented by Molly, where "complicate" is a typo.

(The presence of other typos in the text increases the probability that "complicate" is a typo; moreover, a "good writer" according to Molly would have marked an intentional "complicate" in some way.)

You're lost in your own contradictions again, Mr P.

is = categoric
probability = modality

Make your mind up.
Molly
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 4017

complicate vs. complicated #103 (permalink) Mon Jun 09, 2008 23:20 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Molly wrote:
"Complicated" is the "natural choice" in the original example. It's also the "natural choice" in e.g. the "pricing mechanism" example presented by Molly, where "complicate" is a typo.

(The presence of other typos in the text increases the probability that "complicate" is a typo; moreover, a "good writer" according to Molly would have marked an intentional "complicate" in some way.)

You're lost in your own contradictions again, Mr P.

Which parts are contradictory, old chap?

MrP
MrPedantic
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 1326
Location: Southern England

complicate vs. complicated #104 (permalink) Mon Jun 09, 2008 23:24 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Quote:
Which parts are contradictory, old chap?

As usual, yours.

All we are left with is Mr P FEELS that "complicate" is a typo in the above text, but Molly is not sure. If you're happy with your TAKE on that, enjoy! Me, I'll go on researching "complicate (adj.). Back soon.
Molly
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 4017

complicate vs. complicated #105 (permalink) Mon Jun 09, 2008 23:48 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Molly wrote:
Quote:
Which parts are contradictory, old chap?

As usual, yours.

If the text were perfectly proof-read elsewhere, it would diminish the probability that "complicate" is a typo, in that example.

Therefore it isn't a contradiction to say that the presence of typos elsewhere increases the probability.

If all the factors I mentioned earlier are taken into account, that probability is so close to 1 that the word's typo-ness is in effect a certainty.

MrP
MrPedantic
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 1326
Location: Southern England

Display posts from previous:   
"Walking on the footpath" vs "Walking along the footpath" | I've drunk two cups of tea this morning. vs I drank two cups of tea this morning.
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
Page 7 of 8
Latest topics on English Forums
Expression: "Although he has got a lot of potential..."Help me with this exerciseThe best way to inscribe a diary?Finding mistake (The jumping mouse , especially when...)Sentence correction: I am requesting meeting with you regarding on performanceUsage of "such as to"rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasionthe snow v.s. snowSentence: From the article, it is difficult to assess the activity of Mr. X'So' is placed before a verb?Usage of latelyproblem with mean of a phrase! - "yet in still"So difficult to understand! When she came a clear first out of the 530 candidates

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail