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complicate vs. complicated


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complicate vs. complicated #1 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 7:08 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

Hello,

I looked up several dictionaries, and many of them says complicate can be used as an adjective meaning 'complex' 'involved'. Then, how is different from 'complicated'?

For example,

_______ application procedures have resulted in a drop in interest in our investment and other financial services packages.

(A) Complicating
(B) Complicated
(C) Complicates
(D) Complicate

The answer is (B). How about (D)? I know complicate is used almost as a verb, right? But if it could be used as an adjective, can it fill in the blank above?

Thank you in advance,

sweetpumpkin
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complicate vs. complicated #2 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 7:12 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

Should be (B). And "complicate" can't be used as an adjective, I think.
Haihao
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complicate vs. complicated #3 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 8:40 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

Haihao wrote:
Should be (B). And "complicate" can't be used as an adjective, I think.

Indeed it can:

ADJECTIVE: (-kt)1. Complex, intricate, and involved. 2. Biology Folded longitudinally one or several times, as certain leaves or the wings of some insects.

http://www.bartleby.com/61/11/C0531100.html

Note the different pronunciation.
Molly
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complicate vs. complicated #4 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 8:43 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

Oh yes, it can. My ignorance, very sorry.
Haihao
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Joined: 26 Oct 2006
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complicate vs. complicated #5 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 8:44 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

No, it was a surprise to me also.
Molly
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Joined: 12 Feb 2008
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complicate vs. complicated #6 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 11:38 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

Molly wrote:
Haihao wrote:
Should be (B). And "complicate" can't be used as an adjective, I think.

Indeed it can:

ADJECTIVE: (-kt)1. Complex, intricate, and involved. 2. Biology Folded longitudinally one or several times, as certain leaves or the wings of some insects.

http://www.bartleby.com/61/11/C0531100.html

Note the different pronunciation.

This usage appears to be limited to the field of biology, and an ordinary person can go through his entire life without encountering it. For all other usages, it's best to go with "complicated".
Jamie (K)
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complicate vs. complicated #7 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 12:22 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Jamie (K) wrote:
This usage appears to be limited to the field of biology, and an ordinary person can go through his entire life without encountering it. For all other usages, it's best to go with "complicated".

Maybe, Jamie, but can you answer this question?

Quote:
Then, how is different from 'complicated'?

BTW, do you expect that only ordinary learners visit this site?
Molly
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Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 4017

complicate vs. complicated #8 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 13:07 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

I guess the difference between 'complicated' and 'complicate' (both adjectives) is, 'complicated' bears a sense of 'been made complex' whereas 'complicate' just 'been complex'.
Haihao
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Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 2471
Location: Japan

complicate vs. complicated #9 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 13:29 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Haihao wrote:
I guess the difference between 'complicated' and 'complicate' (both adjectives) is, 'complicated' bears a sense of 'been made complex' whereas 'complicate' just 'been complex'.

I'd say that "complicate" as an adjective would mean something to the effect of "of complex composition".
Jamie (K)
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6771
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

complicate vs. complicated #10 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 13:33 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

But ''complicated' would as well mean "of complex composition" = "containing intricately combined or involved parts"
Haihao
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Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 2471
Location: Japan

complicate vs. complicated #11 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 13:39 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

Haihao wrote:
But ''complicated' would as well mean "of complex composition" = "containing intricately combined or involved parts"

There is a different feeling between one and the other that I'm having trouble coming up with an explanation for. This is going to require some thinking.
Jamie (K)
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 6771
Location: Detroit, Michigan, USA

complicate vs. complicated #12 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 15:34 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

complicate

Folded upon itself; folded lengthwise

http://glossary.gardenweb.com/glossary/complicate.html

I get a feeling that "complicated"

-----

But:

Complicated

Made complex; denoting a disease upon which a morbid process or event has been superimposed, altering symptoms and modifying its course for the worse.

Origin: L. Com-plico, pp. -atus, to fold together

http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Complicated
Molly
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complicate vs. complicated #13 (permalink) Fri May 30, 2008 20:51 pm   complicate vs. complicated
 

This clears everything up! Thank you, Molly.
Haihao
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Joined: 26 Oct 2006
Posts: 2471
Location: Japan

complicate vs. complicated #14 (permalink) Sat May 31, 2008 1:49 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

I could conclude then both complicate and complicated 'can' fill in the blank above. The question above is not a good one... But the direction says(I didn't put it here) 'Select the best answer to complete the sentence'. Then I think the best answer goes to 'complicated'. I googled and found out the word 'procedure' is usually used with 'complicated', not 'complicate'. Besides, I checked www.americancorpus.org , and it showed that complicate is almost used as a verb. Surely, complicate 'can' fill in the blank, but most of native speakers use 'complicated' instead of it and think the latter is more natural... my guess.

Anyway, thank you for answering my question. I'm really glad many 'GOSUes'(In Korean, 'Gosu'[gosu] literally means 'a better hand', standing for someone with higher skills, an expert, or a superior.) help me out here. :D
Sweetpumpkin
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 17 Dec 2007
Posts: 566
Location: S.Korea

complicate vs. complicated #15 (permalink) Sat May 31, 2008 8:46 am   complicate vs. complicated
 

Quote:
I could conclude then both complicate and complicated 'can' fill in the blank above.

I agree.
Molly
I'm a Communicator ;-)


Joined: 12 Feb 2008
Posts: 4017

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