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Get into difficulties vs. get into trouble



 
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Get into difficulties vs. get into trouble #1 (permalink) Tue Mar 01, 2005 8:47 am   Get into difficulties vs. get into trouble
 

Test No. express/advan-8 "From Shakespeare originally", question 3

She had got herself in a pickle by trying to please everyone at the same time.

(a) info confusion
(b) into trouble
(c) into difficulties
(d) into problems

Test No. express/advan-8 "From Shakespeare originally", answer 3

She had got herself into difficulties by trying to please everyone at the same time.

Correct answer: (c) into difficulties

Your answer was: incorrect
She had got herself into trouble by trying to please everyone at the same time.
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Hello Sir,
please explain me the difference bwtween" into trouble" and "into difficulties".
why can't "into troubles" be the answer?
Thnx,
Anshul Rusia
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Get into difficulties vs. get into trouble #2 (permalink) Tue Mar 01, 2005 9:48 am   Get into difficulties vs. get into trouble
 

Get into difficulties means find yourself in a situation where you can't manage. For example if you are in deep water and find yourself unable to swim or you find you have big money problems. Get into trouble means you have done something wrong. For example if you have broken the law.
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Get into difficulties vs. get into trouble #3 (permalink) Thu Nov 09, 2006 7:53 am   Get into difficulties vs. get into trouble
 

Hi,

I was familiar with 'be in a so and so pickle', i.e. in a sad pickle, in a nice pickle etc, as an idiom. It seems alright as well without so and so here, so, is it OK without them?

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Pickle #4 (permalink) Thu Nov 09, 2006 8:59 am   Pickle
 

Hi,

I am not familiar with the use of pickle when it is qualified. I know 'get into a pickle' 'be in a pickle' and perhaps 'be in a bit of a pickle'.

A
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