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to comfort; to console; to encourage; to relieve; to appease
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion


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ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Sentence: From the article, it is difficult to assess the activity of Mr. X | Usage of lately
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #1 (permalink) Mon Jun 09, 2008 20:16 pm   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Hi,

I lighted on this sentence:

Quote:
His rival had slowed him down, but he had risen to the challenge and then above it

If I replace the bold part with "risen to the occasion", will the sentence retain the same meaning ? In other words, do rise to the challenge and rise to the occasion bear the same meaning ?

Thanks in advance !
Lost_Soul
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #2 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 3:01 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Hi Alex

Yes, I'd say you could also use "risen to the occasion" without any real difference in meaning.
.
.
By the way, you've either got the wrong verb or a couple of typos in the title of this thread. :wink:
.
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #3 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 4:51 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Thank you, Amy!

Yankee wrote:
By the way, you've either got the wrong verb or a couple of typos in the title of this thread. :wink:
.

The typos are gone :wink:
Lost_Soul
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #4 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 6:56 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

I've heard "rise to the occasion" used in reference to men who suffer temporary impotency due to over-consumption of alchohol and as a result are unable to copulate, so to speak. I've never heard "rise to the challenge" used in that way. Maybe each expression is found in different contexts.
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #5 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 9:58 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Quote:
I've heard "rise to the occasion" used in reference to men who suffer temporary impotency due to over-consumption of alchohol and as a result are unable to copulate, so to speak

What kind of books do you usually read Molly? :wink:
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #6 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 10:43 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

daemon99 wrote:
What kind of books do you usually read Molly? :wink:

Ones with pictures. :P
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #7 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 10:53 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Just to quote daemon99's "I am head over heels in love with English" to ask a question: why "head over heels"? Shouldn't "heels over head" be reasonable to manifest the hidden meaning? (half fun) :)
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #8 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 11:00 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Haihao wrote:
Just to quote daemon99's "I am head over heels in love with English" to ask a question: why "head over heels"? Shouldn't "heels over head" be reasonable to manifest the hidden meaning? (half fun) :)

No, it shouldn't, I believe, the idiom goes "to be head over heels in love" :)
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #9 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 11:01 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Could you tell me why, Alex? :)
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #10 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 11:29 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Haihao wrote:
Could you tell me why, Alex? :)

Many native speakers I've met do say only "I'm head over heels".
Molly
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #11 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 11:56 am   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

I mean, why? Is it normal to be head over heels? Everyone is, isn't it? To fall in love intensely should be heels over head, right? I am sorry I made a half fun on it but I am sure the idiom originally meant that.
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #12 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 12:40 pm   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Hi Haihao

You're right about that idiom not being particularly logical, but logic is often hard (if not impossible) to find in idioms. Have you heard the expression "I could care less"? And how is it possible to "watch your head" when someone tells you to do this? :lol:
.
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #13 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 13:15 pm   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Yankee wrote:
Hi Haihao

You're right about that idiom not being particularly logical, but logic is often hard (if not impossible) to find in idioms. Have you heard the expression "I could care less"? And how is it possible to "watch your head" when someone tells you to do this? :lol:
.

Hi, Amy

Actually, "I could care less" is somewhat logical (like some time ago in the same situation, I could care even less about it, but now my "care threshold" has risen) :)

What beats me is why you say "that's a likely story" when you don't believe that the story holds true.
(like
Speaker A: Yesterday I shook hands with the president
Speaker B: That's a likely story)

As you would say, go figure :lol:
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #14 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 13:20 pm   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

Haihao wrote:
Could you tell me why, Alex? :)

Hi, Haihao

To me, "head over heels" always conjures up a mental image of a person who's running so fast to the object of his/her adoration that he's almost rolling on the ground with his head over his heels. I know it's a bit crazy, but that's how I imagine it :)
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rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion #15 (permalink) Tue Jun 10, 2008 13:20 pm   rise to the challenge v.s. rise to the occasion
 

.
Interesting interpretation, Alex. :lol:
.
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