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Who vs. whom



 
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Who vs. whom #1 (permalink) Tue Jun 24, 2008 21:58 pm   Who vs. whom
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #47 "Question Words", question 9

My mother is the one ......... sings on TV every morning.

(a) whom
(b) which
(c) who
(d) whose

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #47 "Question Words", answer 9

My mother is the one who sings on TV every morning.

Correct answer: (c) who
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when should i use who and whom and what is the difference between please?

nassar
nassar
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Who vs. whom #2 (permalink) Tue Jun 24, 2008 23:37 pm   Who vs. whom
 

my understanding is that "who" is a subject and "whom" is an object.

"Who eats rice these days?" -- "Who" is the subject

"Rice is eaten by whom?" -- "Rice" is the subject

"Who gets the rice?" -- "Who" is the subject

"To whom is rice given?" -- "Rice" is the subject, since we could re-phrase this as "Rice is given to whom?"

One trick to perhaps make things easier is that "whom" is often preceded by a preposition:

To whom
Through whom
For whom
Under whom
With whom
In/Into whom

etc.

Who is the best player in the world?
For whom is this play best suited?

I once knew a person who could eat two pounds of steak in one sitting.
I once knew a person for whom one pound of steak was not sufficient.

I hope that helps somewhat!

There are cases in which "whom" is used without a preposition. Here's an example:

"Whom did you call last night when you got home?"

In this case, "you" is the subject.

This could be re-stated as "You called whom last night when you got home?"

When the sentence is written that way, it's (hopefully) easier to spot the subject.
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Who vs. whom #3 (permalink) Wed Jun 25, 2008 10:42 am   Who vs. whom
 

Hi Nassar, in addition to Tom's very interesting explanation you might want to read who vs. whom to understand the difference between both words.

TOEIC listening, photographs: A bathroom with an oval tub
Torsten
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Who vs. whom #4 (permalink) Wed Jun 17, 2009 5:29 am   Who vs. whom
 

it was good explenation, thanks, help me a lot:-)
Karolinaadamiec
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Joined: 10 Dec 2008
Posts: 6
Location: Puerto Rico

Who vs whom #5 (permalink) Fri Jun 19, 2009 15:08 pm   Who vs whom
 

Hi all,
It may be a frequently asked question, but I would appreacite it if you explain the difference again. When should I use whom and when should I use who?
Thanks
Endless Hope
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Who vs. whom #6 (permalink) Fri Jun 19, 2009 15:21 pm   Who vs. whom
 

Thanks alot.
EndlessHope
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 09 May 2009
Posts: 47

Who vs. whom #7 (permalink) Sun Nov 29, 2009 0:06 am   Who vs. whom
 

Thank you Prezbucky for the explanation..
Watie
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Posts: 162
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