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Shouldn't it be '...helped him blow off some steam...'?



 
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Shouldn't it be '...helped him blow off some steam...'? #1 (permalink) Sat Jun 28, 2008 3:37 am   Shouldn't it be '...helped him blow off some steam...'?
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #295 "English Slang Idioms (17)", question 2

Jack knew that he should go for a run. Running helped him blow of some ......... after an aggravating day in the office.

(a) pounds
(b) balloons
(c) steam
(d) sweat

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #295 "English Slang Idioms (17)", answer 2

Jack knew that he should go for a run. Running helped him blow of some steam after an aggravating day in the office.

Correct answer: (c) steam

Your answer was: correct
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Hi
Shouldn't it be '...helped him blow off some steam...'?
Thanks,

Englishholic
English_holic
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Shouldn't it be '...helped him blow off some steam...'? #2 (permalink) Sat Jun 28, 2008 7:16 am   Shouldn't it be '...helped him blow off some steam...'?
 

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Yes, thanks. Englishholic. 'Of' should be 'off'. An administrator will take care of this soon.
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