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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place"



 
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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #1 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 5:57 am   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #522 "English Slang Idioms (264)", question 3

"I don't think you should run for school president, Mike. I like you but I don't think you'll stand a .......... The other candidates are much more popular and have more money," Craig said.

(a) shot
(b) chance
(c) place
(d) placement

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #522 "English Slang Idioms (264)", answer 3

"I don't think you should run for school president, Mike. I like you but I don't think you'll stand a chance. The other candidates are much more popular and have more money," Craig said.

Correct answer: (b) chance
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Why not place?

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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #2 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 11:41 am   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

.
'Stand a place' is not an English idiom-- in fact, I don't know what it might mean.
.
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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #3 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 11:44 am   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

Hi, MM

May "stand a place" mean "to protect the place from enemy, not allow the enemy to occupy it"?

Thanks!
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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #4 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 12:26 pm   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

lost_soul wrote:
Hi, MM

May "stand a place" mean "to protect the place from enemy, not allow the enemy to occupy it"?

Thanks!

I think you are thinking along the lines of "stand firm" or "last stand" but I agree with Mr Micawber, I cannot really see how the particular phrase "stand a place" would mean anything in any context.

possibly one..."I can't stand that place"
i.e. to be able to stand a place
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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #5 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 12:32 pm   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

Benjamin wrote:
I think you are thinking along the lines of "stand firm" or "last stand" but I agree with Mr Micawber,

No, I was thinking of "I will stand my ground and won't budge an inch".
But perhaps "stand one's ground" is idiomatic and "stand a place" does not work. I searched Google for examples, but in vain. :(
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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #6 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 16:25 pm   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

lost_soul wrote:
But perhaps "stand one's ground" is idiomatic and "stand a place" does not work. I searched Google for examples, but in vain. :(
I bet you wouldn't have one iota of trouble finding "stand in a line", though. That is a very valid collocation. :mrgreen:
(But that was a different test question, wasn't it?) :wink:
.
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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #7 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 17:12 pm   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

Yankee wrote:
I bet you wouldn't have one iota of trouble finding "stand in a line", though. That is a very valid collocation. :mrgreen:
(But that was a different test question, wasn't it?) :wink:
.

Yeah, I suppose I would stand a fat chance of finding "stand in a line" on the internet :lol:
(by the way, do you use "to stand a chance" in positive sentences, like I just did ? )
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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #8 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 17:39 pm   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

Good question about usage, Alex.

You wrote this:
"Yeah, I suppose I would stand a fat chance of finding "stand in a line" on the internet."

"Stand a fat chance" is basically an emphatic way to say "do not stand a chance" -- i.e. "the possibility (of something happening) is extremely unlikely".

I'd say 'stand a chance' is mostly used negatively or carries a negative sense:

- "I don't stand a chance of winning." (I believe there is no hope that I will win.)

- "Do I stand a chance of winning?" (This suggests that I am not particularly hopeful that I will win.)
.
.

By the way, in AmE, both 'stand in line' and 'stand in a line' are used in reference to people in a 'queue', and these American usages are not difficult to research and verify. Unfortunately, on this site, it seems some people would rather categorize the valid AmE usage of 'stand in a line' as simply being 'incorrect'. It seems we don't stand a chance of having that other test sentence rectified. :?
.
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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #9 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 17:46 pm   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

Yankee wrote:
"Stand a fat chance" is basically an emphatic way to say "do not stand a chance" -- i.e. "the possibility (of something happening) is extremely unlikely".

Then I misused the "stand a fat chance" expresion. What I meant to say is that I would have a big chance of finding "stand in a line"

In fact, I did this mistake because "fat" in my mind always has to do with something big, but, as you said, if I say I stand a fat chance of survival it will mean that basically I don't stand a chance of survival.

I hope that this time I didn't mess anything up, did I ? :? :D
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"stand a chance" vs "stand a place" #10 (permalink) Mon Jul 07, 2008 17:51 pm   "stand a chance" vs "stand a place"
 

Hi Alex

The expression 'fat chance' seems as though it should (literally) mean 'big chance', but 'fat chance' is typically used ironically/sarcastically.
.
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