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Beginning vs. Begin


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Beginning vs. Begin #1 (permalink) Thu Mar 24, 2005 16:00 pm   Beginning vs. Begin
 

Test No. incompl/elem-6 "Start/Begin", question 4

I read the ......... of that book but I couldn't possibly read the whole story.

(a) starting
(b) start
(c) beginning
(d) begin

Test No. incompl/elem-6 "Start/Begin", answer 4

I read the beginning of that book but I couldn't possibly read the whole story.

Correct answer: (c) beginning
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Why not begin???

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Beginning #2 (permalink) Thu Mar 24, 2005 16:35 pm   Beginning
 

You need the noun here beginning.
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Beginning vs. Begin #3 (permalink) Thu Feb 21, 2008 8:20 am   Beginning vs. Begin
 

And why not starting?
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Beginning vs. Begin #4 (permalink) Thu Feb 21, 2008 9:56 am   Beginning vs. Begin
 

Hi,

'Starting' is not usually used as a noun but more often in an adjectival function as 'starting point'.

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Edita #5 (permalink) Sat Mar 28, 2009 11:46 am   Edita
 

Hi,
can someone explain me this "start" and "begin" writing???
It's realy important to me :cry:
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Beginning vs. Begin #6 (permalink) Sun Apr 11, 2010 14:54 pm   Beginning vs. Begin
 

sir please explain me why beginning and why not starting???
as starting is used for the initial phase of something like reading or writing etc...
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Beginning vs. Begin #7 (permalink) Sun Apr 11, 2010 15:13 pm   Beginning vs. Begin
 

begin a story, begin a book, begin to write, begin the sentence.

All these things have a very specific point of beginning, compared to these:

start a car, start a motor, start reading, start the engine, start work.

That said, English speakers often use them interchangeably (except for starting motors, engines and the like, where 'begin' is never used.) so other than for exams and tests (which of course, will concern you a great deal!) you won't have to worry about them too much.
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Beginning vs. Begin #8 (permalink) Tue Aug 24, 2010 9:45 am   Beginning vs. Begin
 

please, could give the meanings of "start off", "begin off", "begin up" and "start up"? thank you.
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Beginning vs. Begin #9 (permalink) Tue Aug 24, 2010 10:40 am   Beginning vs. Begin
 

Hi,

'Begin off' doesn't exist nor does 'begin up'.

'Start off' suggests starting for the very first time. 'Start up' is often used to start a motor/engine that is being used after a break or pause.

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Beginning vs. Begin #10 (permalink) Fri Feb 04, 2011 9:15 am   Beginning vs. Begin
 

I was confused in this Question
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to not to be confused #11 (permalink) Sat Mar 26, 2011 6:19 am   to not to be confused
 

you should study the 3rd test in this page to understand the explanation
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Beginning vs. Begin #12 (permalink) Thu Mar 31, 2011 8:42 am   Beginning vs. Begin
 

is ' beginning allways followed by the'?
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Beginning vs. Begin #13 (permalink) Thu Mar 31, 2011 9:19 am   Beginning vs. Begin
 

Hi Phuong81299,

I am afraid that is an impossible question to answer because there are many ways you could use the word in a sentence. 'Beginning' can be both a noun and also a participle formed from the verb 'begin'.

Remember the spelling of 'always'.

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Beginning vs. Begin #14 (permalink) Thu Mar 31, 2011 10:11 am   Beginning vs. Begin
 

oh...so shy.yes.I will remember..thanks Alan
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Beginning vs. Begin #15 (permalink) Tue Apr 12, 2011 6:56 am   Beginning vs. Begin
 

hello sir
i m still cofused to differntiate b/w begin and start, i have read your article "start and begin" .
would you explain me? thanks in advance:)
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