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Native speakers wanted!


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Native speakers wanted! #31 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 2:04 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

Molly wrote:
I'd like to hear him pre-drama school days. Anything out there?

Yeah, he was 17 when he founded a pro-long hair society.
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Native speakers wanted! #32 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 4:14 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

hi

I concur with Torsten´s general premise that exposure means you define the kind of English you are exposed to as comprehensible.
Exposed to Scottish English, and taught by a Scot will give you a higher sense of this often dialectically heavy version. However you may have problems with say Ozzie (Australian) English.

Most of my students as they are used to my accent (which is not as strong as some of you think, in comparison to my family), find it easy to comprehend. I had one intermediate to upper intermediate level group that had an Okie (guy from Oklahoma) teacher for three years before me, which had difficulties with my accent in the beginning. This is only natural.

However he has this southern drawl anecdotal style to speech and teaching, that contrasts with my East Midland to Northern British accent that as Jamie pointed out has elements of parsody ( which dates back to my acting and performance poetry days www.kantalk.com/Recording/Play/ID/4285

There are many accents in BrE and this can cause problems, however if we take Alex´s observation of "the office", this is a very regional accent that is not going to turn up in many BrE mainstream films.

But accents are hard if you are not exposed to them, I recently met my first person from Stuttgart, it took some concentration in my listening.
But this is normal for anything you are not used to.
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Native speakers wanted! #33 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 9:51 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

Ralf wrote:
Molly wrote:
I'd like to hear him pre-drama school days. Anything out there?

Yeah, he was 17 when he founded a pro-long hair society.

Where did he get that accent?
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Native speakers wanted! #34 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 9:55 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

Quote:
But accents are hard if you are not exposed to them,

And which site would you say better exposes ESL students to accents, "Torsten's", above, or this one http://accent.gmu.edu/ ?

One note on the link you gave, Stew:

Quote:
The strikers attack the back four like the siege on an enemie’s castle.
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Native speakers wanted! #35 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:25 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

stew.t. wrote:
.But accents are hard if you are not exposed to them, I recently met my first person from Stuttgart, it took some concentration in my listening.
Did he pronounce "Stuttgart" for you? :lol:

stew.t. wrote:
Exposed to Scottish English, and taught by a Scot will give you a higher sense of this often dialectically heavy version.
My German students almost always had trouble understanding people from Scottland.
.
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Native speakers wanted! #36 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:53 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

Yankee wrote:
stew.t. wrote:
Exposed to Scottish English, and taught by a Scot will give you a higher sense of this often dialectically heavy version.
My German students almost always had trouble understanding people from Scottland.
.

I wonder whether they'd've had trouble understanding these speakers?

http://accent.gmu.edu/searchsaa.php?function=detail&speakerid=82

http://accent.gmu.edu/searchsaa.php?function=detail&speakerid=611
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Native speakers wanted! #37 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 12:24 pm   Native speakers wanted!
 

.
I'd say they'd have more trouble with the second speaker.
.
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Native speakers wanted! #38 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 15:19 pm   Native speakers wanted!
 

stew.t. wrote:
Most of my students as they are used to my accent (which is not as strong as some of you think, in comparison to my family), find it easy to comprehend. I had one intermediate to upper intermediate level group that had an Okie (guy from Oklahoma) teacher for three years before me, which had difficulties with my accent in the beginning. This is only natural.

Hi Stew,

To me the most remarkable aspect of your story is that your Okie teacher taught a group of "upper-intermediate students" for three years and during that long period of time it did not occur to those students that they can learn English only if they get daily exposure to a variety of English accents. I think that the vast majority of learners believe they can learn English by attending English classes once or twice a week. That's an amazing thought, isn't it?

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Native speakers wanted! #39 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 16:27 pm   Native speakers wanted!
 

Hi Torsten

When I was in Germany, I constantly told my students that they had to do more than simply attend an English course once or twice a week. I had one class that spontaneously started finishing my sentence for me whenever I began "Even if you only turn on CNN as background noise for half an hour every day..." :lol:

It is generally pretty obvious which students in any given ESL class do more than simply attend the class.
.
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Native speakers wanted! #40 (permalink) Wed Sep 03, 2008 19:40 pm   Native speakers wanted!
 

Torsten wrote:
To me the most remarkable aspect of your story is that your Okie teacher taught a group of "upper-intermediate students" for three years and during that long period of time it did not occur to those students that they can learn English only if they get daily exposure to a variety of English accents. I think that the vast majority of learners believe they can learn English by attending English classes once or twice a week. That's an amazing thought, isn't it?

In the academy where I work we have a quite few students taking English by telephone classes. One or two of those students only take 30 mins per week and do nothing outside the class to develop their usage. Occasionally, the same students will suddenly announce that they want to take an intensive classes because they have an upcoming international business meeting, or something. The intensive they have in mind normally consists of taling an extra 30 mins phone class per week.

Odd thing is, at the end of each cycle of classes they often complain that they haven't really moved on usage-wise. :roll:
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reply answer of message ( wanting job) #41 (permalink) Thu Sep 04, 2008 7:49 am   reply answer of message ( wanting job)
 

Hi ,terston .. what a job do you have in your net of teaching English language? say that you are a face of government or others! please here I came only for intersting and spending the wasts of time , yes in the previos year my goal is to learn English or any scine in American universites, but I was attached in the yahoo page costumers that I cant gate the success in united state, and the American lady whome she reply to me the message said that your figurative language or your figure of speech is a weak , from that date I applied my application to an evening collage of translation English for arabic in my country , that is the whole story .. thank you Toeston .. I hope to get the advantage here by presenting every day in the english-test.net.
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Native speakers wanted! #42 (permalink) Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:41 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

Torsten wrote:
Hi Alex,

I think you find "British English" more difficult to understand because you primarily have been exposed to American English. For example, if you google "Amy MacDonald interview", you will find a youtube clip that features two speakers of Scottish English which might sound very unusual and "unintelligible" to you. But this dialect is not unintelligible to other native speakers of English at all because they get much more exposure to a variety of accents than an average ESL learner.

Let me know what you think.
Спасибо,
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Hi, Torsten

Yes, you certainly have a point there. :) To tell the truth I'm more inclined to learn American pronunciation, and I have already listened to quite a lot of audio material narrated by American narrators. My acquaintance with the British accent on the other hand is scanty, although sometimes I'm having a hard time making out American speech either, especially when they use slang unknown to me.
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Native speakers wanted! #43 (permalink) Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:54 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

Jamie (K) wrote:
How is Brandee's speech not close to reality? She speaks the way people in my neighborhood do.

Is speech "close to reality" if it's hard to understand and "not close to reality" if it's easy to understand?

Yes, there's a lot in what you say. Based on the movies I've watched, her pace is very close to how most people speak.
It's just when people use slang words/expressions I haven't heard of, and use them "fast", I can't comprehend what they're saying and I find their speech hard, but Brandee, on the contrary, did not use any slang I would not understand, that is why I pegged her speech as "unrealistic".
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Native speakers wanted! #44 (permalink) Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:58 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

Hi Alex,

The interesting thing is that so many ESL learners use the term "British accent" in the singular form. There actually is no such thing as just one "British accent". People in Great Britain and Ireland use a variety of accents and I think that's the reason why so many learners have difficulty understanding "British English".

As you mentioned, to understand a spoken English basically means two things:
1) You understand speech phonetically. That's what you mean by "make out American speech".
2) You understand the meaning of what's being said.

Many learners of English are not aware of this distinction. They just say that they don't understand native speakers without making the effort to analyze what exactly it is that they don't "understand".

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Native speakers wanted! #45 (permalink) Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:58 am   Native speakers wanted!
 

Quote:
Brandee, on the contrary, did not use any slang I would not understand, that is why I pegged her speech as "unrealistic".

It's "unrealistic" for more reasons than that, IMO. It's very EFLese, stilted, plastic, etc.
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