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"He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct?



 
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What is the difference between connectors and transition signals? | Could vs Can (Is it correct to say, 'I think I could get the job'?)
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"He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct? #1 (permalink) Sun Aug 24, 2008 12:07 pm   "He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct?
 

1. "He said, she is happy"- I think, this is wrong. Is there any situation, in which, this type of sentence would be correct?

Said+is
Told+is OR Told+are.

2. "Given your feedback, I will change the name of the file"- is this correct?
I mean, based on your feedback, I will change the name of file.

"Given John's advice, I will change it"- is this correct?
Given John's advice= Based on John's advice...
Sureshvemuri
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"He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct? #2 (permalink) Sun Aug 24, 2008 13:21 pm   "He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct?
 

Hi sureshvemuri,

1. "He said, she is happy" - the sentence is fine. It's the short way of saying 'He said that she is happy'.

2. "Given your feedback, I will change the name of the file" - this one is fine, too. It means about the same as "based on your feedback, I will change the name of file". 'Given' here means as much as 'provided that'.
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"He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct? #3 (permalink) Sun Aug 24, 2008 14:08 pm   "He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct?
 

Hi sureshvemuri

Quote:
1. "He said, she is happy"
I would remove the comma from this sentence. The use of the simple present would reflect the fact that her state of being 'happy' is still current.
- He said she is happy.

Quote:
2. "Given your feedback, I will change the name of the file"- is this correct?
'Given your feedback' can be used to mean 'based on your feedback' or 'in view of your feedback'. To me, your sentence suggests that the speaker already has the feedback, and as a result is going to change the name of the file. In other words, first the feedback, then the change.

Personally, I would not equate 'given' with 'provided that' in your sentence. If you wrote "Provided that you give me feedback, I will change the name of the file", that would mean that the speaker does not yet have any feedback (and also has not yet changed the name, of course). And the meaning may well be that the speaker wants feedback after the file name is changed. In other words, first the change, then the feedback.
.
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"He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct? #4 (permalink) Sun Aug 24, 2008 15:06 pm   "He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct?
 

Thanks Yankee and Ralf, for your elaborate and comprehensive replies and time as well.
Thank you very much!

One thing I can not understand is - name of the file - should be correct. Likewise, Name of the car, Name of the building.

But, I do see like "car's name" and "Building's name".
Are these correct?

If I am required to post this question as a separate thing, I will do it. But it would create a separate thread and will eat up server space as well.

"How much time DO you want to use my phone"
Here, - DO- required or not.
"How much time --- you want to use my phone" - Is this ok?

Thanks,
Suresh
Sureshvemuri
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 19 Jul 2008
Posts: 733
Location: India, Hyderabad

"He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct? #5 (permalink) Sun Aug 24, 2008 22:34 pm   "He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct?
 

Hi Suresh
Quote:
But, I do see like "car's name" and "Building's name".
Are these correct?
I wouldn't say those are wrong, but I think "name of the car/building" sounds better. Native speakers do use the possessive 's with both people and things, however it's more commonly used with people.
Quote:
"How much time DO you want to use my phone"
Here, - DO- required or not.
"How much time --- you want to use my phone" - Is this ok?
I might describe it this way:

Standard/formal English: How long do you want to use my phone?/How long would you like to use my phone?

Spoken/informal English: How long d'you wanna use my phone? / How long ya wanna use my phone?

In informal (mainly spoken) English, the word 'do' is often omitted (or barely pronounced), especially when the question would otherwise begin with the the word 'do'.
.
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"He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct? #6 (permalink) Mon Aug 25, 2008 4:31 am   "He said, she is happy"- In any situation, is this correct?
 

Thank you very much Yankee.
Your name reminds me about the civil war between Southern and Northern regions of the US some decades ago. I heard there were two groups (I don't know how to call them, in fact they were two movements) and they had clashed on different issues.
Anyway, I am not sure - perhaps I may be wrong.
Sureshvemuri
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 19 Jul 2008
Posts: 733
Location: India, Hyderabad

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