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Haven't a clue



 
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Haven't a clue #1 (permalink) Sat Apr 02, 2005 16:40 pm   Haven't a clue
 

Test No. incompl/elem-31 "Responses (4)", question 4

Mike: 'Guess how much income tax I pay.'
Jane: '.........'

(a) I haven't a thought.
(b) I haven't a belief.
(c) I haven't a point.
(d) I haven't a clue.

Test No. incompl/elem-31 "Responses (4)", answer 4

Mike: 'Guess how much income tax I pay.'
Jane: 'I haven't a clue.'

Correct answer: (d) I haven't a clue.

Your answer was: incorrect
Mike: 'Guess how much income tax I pay.'
Jane: 'I haven't a point.'
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please explain this to me.

thanks
Sameer
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Haven't a clue #2 (permalink) Sat Apr 02, 2005 19:09 pm   Haven't a clue
 

This means I have no idea. A clue is something that helps you find the answer to a puzzle or problem. A police detective looks for clues to help find the answer to a crime.
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Haven't a clue #3 (permalink) Thu Feb 18, 2010 19:04 pm   Haven't a clue
 

Hi Alan,

''I haven't a clue'' and ''I don't have a clue''. Are those two expressions grammatically correct?
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Haven't a clue #4 (permalink) Thu Feb 18, 2010 21:10 pm   Haven't a clue
 

'I don't have a clue' is the grammatically correct form but people shall likely understand that 'I haven't a clue' is actually short for 'I haven't got a clue.'
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Haven't a clue #5 (permalink) Thu Feb 18, 2010 21:20 pm   Haven't a clue
 

Thanks OxforBlues.
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Haven't a clue #6 (permalink) Fri Jul 13, 2012 9:22 am   Haven't a clue
 

thanks again and again,.. , Alan
you are so kind :)
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Haven't a clue #7 (permalink) Fri Sep 14, 2012 8:16 am   Haven't a clue
 

Hello there. I'd like to ask the following question: Why can't we say: I haven't a thought?
Thanks a lot.
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Haven't a clue #8 (permalink) Fri Sep 14, 2012 8:22 am   Haven't a clue
 

Because the word 'thought' has a different meaning which does not work in this context.
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Haven't a clue #9 (permalink) Fri Sep 14, 2012 8:30 am   Haven't a clue
 

Thanks one more time, but I thought that this phrase has the same meaning as I've no idea. Am I wrong?
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Haven't a clue #10 (permalink) Fri Sep 14, 2012 9:07 am   Haven't a clue
 

Yes Roman, "I have no clue" means "I have no idea". Понятия не имею.

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Haven't a clue #11 (permalink) Fri Sep 14, 2012 18:12 pm   Haven't a clue
 

This sentence perfectly demonstrates that 'thought' and 'idea' are not always synonymous, because they both have several definitions which do not all match up.
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