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Give a lift to someone



 
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Give a lift to someone #1 (permalink) Mon Apr 04, 2005 22:09 pm   Give a lift to someone
 

Test No. incompl/elem-30 "Responses (3)", question 2

Mike: 'I could give you a lift to the station.'
Jane: '.........'

(a) There's no requirement.
(b) There's no practicality.
(c) There's no aim.
(d) There's no need.

Test No. incompl/elem-30 "Responses (3)", answer 2

Mike: 'I could give you a lift to the station.'
Jane: 'There's no need.'

Correct answer: (d) There's no need.

Your answer was: incorrect
Mike: 'I could give you a lift to the station.'
Jane: 'There's no requirement.'
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What means the expression "to give a lift to the station"? Or it has only the literal sense?
Werdna
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Give a lift to someone #2 (permalink) Tue Apr 05, 2005 9:41 am   Give a lift to someone
 

This means take someone in your car to somewhere.
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Give a lift to someone #3 (permalink) Sat Jun 20, 2009 1:58 am   Give a lift to someone
 

I just wonder if 'There's no need.' means a bit rude or not?
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Give a lift to someone #4 (permalink) Mon Dec 21, 2009 13:18 pm   Give a lift to someone
 

I think "there's no requirement" means that you don't have to do something or you are not obligated to do something as in :There's no requirement that jobs be meaningful. If there was, half the country would be unemployed.

While "there's no need" means that I don't need you to do something as in: There's no need to help me do my homework.

Just my two cents.
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Give a lift to someone #5 (permalink) Mon Dec 21, 2009 13:33 pm   Give a lift to someone
 

Hi,

'There's no need' isn't really rude but just a way of saying that you don't have to.

Alan
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Give a lift to someone #6 (permalink) Sun Jan 03, 2010 16:23 pm   Give a lift to someone
 

Here in usa we say could i give you a ride ? there's no need.

charl
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Re: Give a lift to someone #7 (permalink) Mon Aug 13, 2012 13:17 pm   Re: Give a lift to someone
 

I also thinks so. "There is no need" is not polite!
Duyenneu
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Give a lift to someone #8 (permalink) Mon Aug 13, 2012 14:40 pm   Give a lift to someone
 

It's not impolite.
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