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Listening comprehension and spelling test?


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Listening comprehension and spelling test? #16 (permalink) Sun Feb 01, 2009 6:44 am   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Hi.
I really liked the audio recording.
I am not that good in spelling, so I had some difficalties writing it down. I didn't understand some parts, but I stll tried to write them. A real problem for me were German words, because I don't know German.
I hope you will help me to improve my English.

Here is the rest of Raymond's story:

Listen to Raymond Romanos

...and I was a cook for cowboys. And then I got into a photography, moved back to West Hartford to do more with photography. And then I decided to go down to Washington D.C. and see if I could find work there.

Meanwhile I had met a... a German girl in West Hartford, Connecticut, and we kept in contact. Eh, when I moved down to Virginia, which was near Washington, she had moved back to German. And I didn't like Virginia as much as I thought I would. And she had mentioned that I should come and visit her in Germany and so, I did. And this was back in 1996. So when I came to Germany I had no plans to stay for a long time , but no plans not to stay for a long time. So my original plan was to be with her and to learn German and to see Germany. Mh, so it was in 96 and now we are in 2003 almost 2004. Eh, in the meantime we broke-up , but I stayed in Leipzig, because life is good here. No, life is good here.

When I first came to Leipzig my impression was much different, because this is only 6 years after "The Fall of the Berman Wall". And many things did not exist, for example: ah, take-away coffee or there was very difficult to find a decent sandwich, not all the buildings had been renovated and so it was very grey.

I was not used to the winters here, which were, in compares to Connecticut, not as extreme, but mostly grey. And the winters in Connecticut are typically very-very cold with, eh, with snow. And here it's not as cold, and if there is snow it lasts about 24 hours before it disappears. So, I barley find time to go to skying here, but really you can't go skying here, because there are no mountains. The best thing you can find is a hill somewhere by the sled. So you have to be real fast here in Leipzig to go sledding.

Well, I came to Germany I worked as a photographer, I worked measuring apartments - anything I could do to basically survive. I moved loans, I helped edit texts. And then I finally started teaching English. My first teaching experience in English was very difficult, because I didn't quite understand all the concept of English. I mean I may have studied it in college, but learning how it works and trying to teach it are two different things. So I had to relearn how English worked for me to teach it. Also when I arrived I had to learn German. And so learning German and teching English.

Well, learning German helped me teach English, because when I understood how people learn languages. So, although I have been here for 6 years or 7 years my German is not as good as it could be. Although I can read newspapers and texts and understand them fully I still haven't quite managed to speak like a German. Germans sitten to have a way of using their words, which no... no foreigner could quite master. You have to be German to master German, I think. But it's a fun language: it's more precise than English, it's got many more expressions and dialects are fun to listen to.

I have a lot contact to the local people here in Leipzig. May be because I do teach them. And a lot of my students invite me out to coffee. Or we have advance at night staying up to, which I go out myself. There are a lots of foreigners here, I can meet up with them. There are plenty of foreign round tables for people willing to learn different languages, or for people willing to learn German or English. And so through that I can meet lots of people. And helped me met lots of people.

Most of my friends are either Germans or Americans. I have two very good American friends, the rest of them are German. So I spend most of my time going back and though between English and German. Eh, and I am in fact studying German again privately, so that I can prove it. Because after 7 years, eh, there are many things which you can learn to help you speak better, pronunciation mostly and important the idioms.

I go back about twice a year to America to visit my father, who lives in Connecticut, or to my mother, who lives in South Carolina. I typically go back in the summer around June for a family gathering, which is about 30 people and we rent about 4 cottages on a lake. And we all get together and basically go from one cottage to another eating all way for the two weeks. And that's a lot of fun.

And when I visit my mother, and she lives in South Carolina in the place called Murtle Beach. Eh, there is really not much to do there: you could go mini - shogolfitting or you could go swimming at the beach. But mostly we hang out, we talk.

Back in Connecticut I still have my friends and I still meet-up with my friends. They meet at the coffee-shop in the centre of West Hartford at 2 o'clock for coffee. They been doing this since 1993. And so when I go back I still know everyone and it is fun. I get my free cup of coffee, because they never see me and the people, who work there, still know me. And they brining up the dates as towards been going on. It's a lot of fun.

My language has changed since I been here. Many people who are American would talk to me very slowly and would tell me that my English is very strange, oh, but nice. And I say, "That's nice". And they say, "Where are you from?". and I say, "Well, I am from Connecticut". And they go, "Really?!". And I go, "Yes, really". And they go, "Where is your accent?" And I go, "Well, you can't go around with your accent all your life, if you live somewhere outs. You have to loose it."

And when you teach English You can't teach accents, you have to teach general English, which people can understand. And so I've tried to change my English a little bit, so that people could understand me better. Because when I talk real fast .... And... Well, we'll see when I go back to Connecticut I will talk like a normal Connecticut person. Which will be hard "a:"s, "o"s don't exist. It's not [ko'nektiket], but [ke'nektiket]. And it's not [prog'res], but [prag'res]. So, there is a very distinct "New England" accent. One can heir if once listens to my voice. But... it's mostly , it's mostly talked away.

So among other things my accent has changed as well as my vocabulary. When you talk to an American, who has been living or anybody, who has been living in Leipzig for a long time. Certain words were suddenly falling into your vocabulary, for example "_____" instead of street car or tram. And we would talk about going to that "_________", which is a train station. Or to the "______", which is the Immigration Office. And so we will do... we will use those worlds like "____" for cabinet, or "_____" or "_____" for plate and table. And we will mix and we call this new language Genglish.

And everybody, everyone doesn't matter from what country will mix. And it's very difficult when I go back to The States not to mix. Because I know and I have to keep telling myself, that no-one there understands German. So I can't go mixing like I can do in Germany in Leipzig.

I find it amazing how Germans can express themselves to such a detail. They know exactly what's going on. I just.. I am completely amazed by that. When you ask someone about how a car works and they will tell you, and they will tell you how the car slides and the reasons why the car will slide on the ace or ________ . Or the will give you details which an American person would not do. They would use a lots of ands and ehs and things like that.

And German would tell you to the exact detail what it is. Or they would take kind a head off - they don't know. But... So, It's been quite a learning experience from a technical perspective. So...

Listen to Raymond Romanos
Svitlana_Morokhovych
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 01 Oct 2008
Posts: 25

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #17 (permalink) Sun Feb 01, 2009 22:52 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Hello again!
I find the next Recording much shorter, but it's very hard for me to understand England Accent, but still I tried my best to write it down, although I didn't understand a lot out of it.

I hope you going to respond to my writing, because I really made a lot of mistakes.
Anyways, I want my English to be better, so that's why I am here!

Listen to speaker from London

I have been here now approximately two and a half years and I only feel like I want to start to discover the best parts. For a profession I some times I work as an English teacher. Although his summer I have done some other things. I breed dogs. I have two dogs, one of each is currently in England. And I have a young dog that helped me living off this summer, I am training every day.

I also export and buy from the former Eastern countries, Germany, from the Czechoslovakia, export to London. It seems very popular in the city at the moment. And I intend to do this again before the end of this year.

There are lots of differences between London and Leipzig, but also many similarities. I do think that the people here are very friendly. Perhaps is the capital city the people don't have so much time in London. And here in Leipzig people are very friendly and always have a lot of time for you. And people are very open-mind I find in this city, more also than I would imagine them to be in London.

Eh, the architecture is also very different and onn a very large scale in comparison to what I am used to at home. The weather is also very fine: instead of four very distinct seasons, I would say; have very hot summer; short, but hard winter; also have a distinct autumn and spring too. What it is perhaps in England we do tend to have a very long autumn spring and a very short summer and winter.

Listen to speaker from London
Svitlana_Morokhovych
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 01 Oct 2008
Posts: 25

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Listening comprehension and spelling test? #18 (permalink) Mon Feb 02, 2009 14:44 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

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 103 Listened
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Hello Svitlana,

Thanks a lot for doing such an excellent job with the transcriptions of Ray's and Ed's recordings. I've checked your texts and they seem pretty accurate with a few minor things here and there. I've used the spell checker in Firefox to remove your typos. If you like, you can listen to the recordings again and post those phrases you are not sure about.

Let me know what you think.
Regards,
Torsten

TOEIC listening, photographs: The oil refinery
Torsten
Learning Coach
Torsten Daerr

Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Posts: 17788
Location: EU

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #19 (permalink) Wed Feb 04, 2009 4:23 am   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Hello Torsten,

I really spend some ammount of time doing the texts, so I would be very thankful if you could post the whole correct transcription of the texts, so I would know where I made the mistakes, outherwhise I can only guess......
I think that it woould be really great, If you could send a correct transcriptions to our e-mail addresses after we post it on the web-site, so we can check by ourselves the rest.....

I am not sure, if you gonne like my idea, but I still hope to see all of my mistakes. And then I can work on the spelling of the paticular words, that I misspelled...

I am really excited to be here. ( If someone notise a wrong spelling, they should reply right away, that's the best way to help someone to improve the language, or anykind of grammar mistakes)

I would be only happy to see where I am wrong.

Thank you. Waiting for the responces!!!
Svitlana
Svitlana_Morokhovych
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 01 Oct 2008
Posts: 25

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #20 (permalink) Wed Feb 04, 2009 5:32 am   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Hi Torsten,

AS I said before , it would be much easier for me just to see the orriginal text.....

My question i as follows:

And then I got into (a) photography.......

Do we use the article or not?

Thank you.
Lana
Svitlana_Morokhovych
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 01 Oct 2008
Posts: 25

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #21 (permalink) Thu Feb 05, 2009 14:01 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Please activate Javascript in your browser to listen to this audio recording

 111 Listened
Download mp3 Click to listen

Hi Svitlana,

Thank you again for your great work with the transcript of Ray's recording. You did an excellent job and there were only some minor things. I have corrected your transcript and you can see the corrections in bold below. Let me know if this is OK for you and I'll correct your second transcript too.

Regards,
Torsten

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
And then I got into a photography, moved back to West Hartford to do more with photography. And then I decided to go down to Washington D.C. and see if I could find work there.

And then I got into photography....

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
Mh, so it was in 96 and now we are in 2003 almost 2004. Eh, in the meantime we broke-up , but I stayed in Leipzig, because life is good here. No, life is good here.

Mh, so that was in 96 and now we are in 2003 almost 2004. Eh, in the meantime we broke-up , but I stayed in Leipzig, because life was good here. No, life is good here.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
When I first came to Leipzig my impression was much different, because this is only 6 years after "The Fall of the Berman Wall". And many things did not exist, for example: ah, take-away coffee or there was very difficult to find a decent sandwich, not all the buildings had been renovated and so it was very grey.

When I first came to Leipzig my impression was much different, because this was only 6 years after "The Fall of the German Wall". And many things did not exist, for example: ah, take-away coffee or there was very difficult, it was to find a decent sandwich, not all the buildings had been renovated and so it was very grey.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
I was not used to the winters here, which were, in compares to Connecticut, not as extreme, but mostly grey. And the winters in Connecticut are typically very-very cold with, eh, with snow. And here it's not as cold, and if there is snow it lasts about 24 hours before it disappears. So, I barley find time to go to skying here, but really you can't go skying here, because there are no mountains. The best thing you can find is a hill somewhere by the sled. So you have to be real fast here in Leipzig to go sledding.

I was not used to the winters here, which were, in comparison to Connecticut, not as extreme, but mostly grey. And the winters in Connecticut are typically very-very cold with, eh, with snow. And here it's not as cold, and if there is snow it lasts about 24 hours before it disappears. So, I rarley find time to go to skying here, but really you can't go skying here, because there are no mountains. The best thing you can find is a hill somewhere and find a sled. So you have to be real fast here in Leipzig to go sledding.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
Well, I came to Germany I worked as a photographer, I worked measuring apartments - anything I could do to basically survive. I moved loans, I helped edit texts. And then I finally started teaching English. My first teaching experience in English was very difficult, because I didn't quite understand all the concept of English. I mean I may have studied it in college, but learning how it works and trying to teach it are two different things. So I had to relearn how English worked for me to teach it. Also when I arrived I had to learn German. And so learning German and teching English.

Well, I came to Germany I worked as a photographer, I worked measuring apartments - anything I could do to basically survive. I mowed lawns, I helped edit texts. And then I finally started teaching English. My first teaching experience in English was very difficult, because I didn't quite understand all the concept of English. I mean I may have studied in college, but learning how it works and trying to teach it are two different things. So I had to relearn how English worked for me to teach it. Also when I arrived I had to learn German. And so learning German and teching English.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
Well, learning German helped me teach English, because when I understood how people learn languages. So, although I have been here for 6 years or 7 years my German is not as good as it could be. Although I can read newspapers and texts and understand them fully I still haven't quite managed to speak like a German. Germans sitten to have a way of using their words, which no... no foreigner could quite master. You have to be German to master German, I think. But it's a fun language: it's more precise than English, it's got many more expressions and dialects are fun to listen to.

Well, learning German helped me teach English, because then I understood how people learn languages. So, although I've been here for 6 years or 7 years my German is not as good as it could be. Although I can read newspapers and texts and understand them fully I still haven't quite managed to speak like a German. Germans tend to have a way of using their words, which no... no foreigner could quite master. You have to be German to master German, I think. But it's a fun language: it's more precise than English, it's got many more expressions and dialects are fun to listen to.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
I have a lot contact to the local people here in Leipzig. May be because I do teach them. And a lot of my students invite me out to coffee. Or we have advance at night staying up to, which I go out myself. There are a lots of foreigners here, I can meet up with them. There are plenty of foreign round tables for people willing to learn different languages, or for people willing to learn German or English. And so through that I can meet lots of people. And helped me met lots of people.

I have a lot contact to the local people here in Leipzig. Mainly because I do teach them. And a lot of my students invite me out to coffee. Or we have events at night which they invite my out to, or which I go out myself. There are also lots of foreigners here, I can meet up with them. There are plenty of foreign round tables for people willing to learn different languages, or for people willing to learn German or English. And so through that I can meet lots of people. And it helped me meeting lots of people.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
Most of my friends are either Germans or Americans. I have two very good American friends, the rest of them are German. So I spend most of my time going back and though between English and German. Eh, and I am in fact studying German again privately, so that I can prove it. Because after 7 years, eh, there are many things which you can learn to help you speak better, pronunciation mostly and important the idioms.

Most of my friends are either Germans or Americans. I have two very good American friends, the rest are all German. So I spend most of my time going back and forth between English and German. Eh, and I am in fact studying German again privately, so that I can prove it. Because after 7 years, eh, there are many things which you can learn to help you speak better, pronunciation and mostly and more importantly the idioms.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
I go back about twice a year to America to visit my father, who lives in Connecticut, or to my mother, who lives in South Carolina. I typically go back in the summer around June for a family gathering, which is about 30 people and we rent about 4 cottages on a lake. And we all get together and basically go from one cottage to another eating all way for the two weeks. And that's a lot of fun.

I go back about twice a year to America to visit my father, who lives in Connecticut, or to my mother, who lives in South Carolina. I typically go back in the summer around June for a family gathering, which is about 30 people and we rent about 4 cottages on a lake. And we all get together and basically go from one cottage to another eating our way for two weeks. And that's a lot of fun.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
And when I visit my mother, and she lives in South Carolina in the place called Murtle Beach. Eh, there is really not much to do there: you could go mini - shogolfitting or you could go swimming at the beach. But mostly we hang out, we talk.

Back in Connecticut I still have my friends and I still meet-up with my friends. They meet at the coffee-shop in the centre of West Hartford at 2 o'clock for coffee. They been doing this since 1993. And so when I go back I still know everyone and it is fun. I get my free cup of coffee, because they never see me and the people, who work there, still know me. And they brining up the dates as towards been going on. It's a lot of fun.

And when I visit my mother, and she lives in South Carolina in the place called Murtle Beach. Eh, there is really not much to do there: you could go mini - shogolfitting or you could go swimming at the beach. But mostly we hang out, we talk.

Back in Connecticut I still have my friends and I still meet-up with my friends. They meet at the coffee-shop in the centre of West Hartford at 2 o'clock for coffee. They been doing this since 1993. And so when I go back I still know everyone and it is fun. I get my free cup of coffee, because they never see me and the people, who work there, still know me. And they bring me up to date as to what's been going on. It's a lot of fun.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
My language has changed since I been here. Many people who are American would talk to me very slowly and would tell me that my English is very strange, oh, but nice. And I say, "That's nice". And they say, "Where are you from?". and I say, "Well, I am from Connecticut". And they go, "Really?!". And I go, "Yes, really". And they go, "Where is your accent?" And I go, "Well, you can't go around with your accent all your life, if you live somewhere outs. You have to loose it."

And when you teach English You can't teach accents, you have to teach general English, which people can understand. And so I've tried to change my English a little bit, so that people could understand me better. Because when I talk real fast .... And... Well, we'll see when I go back to Connecticut I will talk like a normal Connecticut person. Which will be hard "a:"s, "o"s don't exist. It's not [ko'nektiket], but [ke'nektiket]. And it's not [prog'res], but [prag'res]. So, there is a very distinct "New England" accent. One can heir if once listens to my voice. But... it's mostly , it's mostly talked away.

My language has changed since I've been here. Many people who are American will talk to me very slowly and will tell me that my English is very strange, oh, but nice. And I say, "That's nice". And they say, "Where're you from?". and I say, "Well, I am from Connecticut". And they go, "Really?!". And I go, "Yes, really". And they go, "Where's your accent?" And I go, "Well, you can't go around with an accent all your life, if you live somewhere else. You have to lose it."

And when you teach English, you can't teach accents, you have to teach a general English which people can understand. And so I've tried to change my English a little bit, so that people can understand me better. Because when I talk real fast .... And... Well, we'll see it when I go back to Connecticut. After a month in Connecticut I will talk like a normal Connecticut person. Which will be hard "r's", "o"s don't exist. It's not [ko'nektiket], but [ke'nektiket]. And it's not [prog'res], but [prag'res]. So, there is a very very distinct "New England" accent. One can hear it if once listens to my voice. But... it's mostly, it's mostly tugged away.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
So among other things my accent has changed as well as my vocabulary. When you talk to an American, who has been living or anybody, who has been living in Leipzig for a long time. Certain words were suddenly falling into your vocabulary, for example "_____" instead of street car or tram. And we would talk about going to that "_________", which is a train station. Or to the "______", which is the Immigration Office. And so we will do... we will use those worlds like "____" for cabinet, or "_____" or "_____" for plate and table. And we will mix and we call this new language Genglish.

And everybody, everyone doesn't matter from what country will mix. And it's very difficult when I go back to The States not to mix. Because I know and I have to keep telling myself, that no-one there understands German. So I can't go mixing like I can do in Germany in Leipzig.

I find it amazing how Germans can express themselves to such a detail. They know exactly what's going on. I just.. I am completely amazed by that. When you ask someone about how a car works and they will tell you, and they will tell you how the car slides and the reasons why the car will slide on the ace or ________ . Or the will give you details which an American person would not do. They would use a lots of ands and ehs and things like that.

And German would tell you to the exact detail what it is. Or they would take kind a head off - they don't know. But... So, It's been quite a learning experience from a technical perspective. So...

Listen to Raymond Romanos

So among other things my accent has changed as well as my vocabulary. When you talk to an American, who has been living or anybody, who has been living in Leipzig for a long time, certain words will suddenly fall into your vocabulary, for example everyone will say 'Strassenbahn' or 'Shrassenbahn' instead of street car or tram. And we will talk about going to that 'Bahnhof', which is the train station or to the 'Ausländerbehördeamt', which is the Immigrations Office. And so we will do... we will use these among other things like "Schrank" for cabinet, or "Teller" or "Tisch" for plate and table. And we will mix and we call this new language Genglish.

And everybody, everyone doesn't matter from what country will mix. And that very difficult when I go back to The States not to mix. Because I know and I have to keep telling myself, that no-one there understands German. So I can't go mixing like I can do in Germany in Leipzig.

I find it amazing how Germans can express themselves to such a detail. They know exactly what's going on. I just.. I am completely amazed by that. When you ask someone about how a car works and they will tell you, and they will tell you how the car slides and the reasons why the car will slide on the ice or hydroplane. Or the will give you details which an American person would not do. They would use lots of ands and ehs and things like that.

But a German would tell you to the exact detail what it is. Or they would say 'Keine Ahnung!' they don't know but so But... So, It's been quite a learning experience from a technical standpoint. So...

TOEIC listening, photographs: Soldiers marching
Torsten
Learning Coach
Torsten Daerr

Joined: 25 Sep 2003
Posts: 17788
Location: EU

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #22 (permalink) Sat Feb 07, 2009 16:56 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Torsten wrote:
Hi Svitlana,

Thank you again for your great work with the transcript of Ray's recording. You did an excellent job and there were only some minor things. I have corrected your transcript and you can see the corrections in bold below. Let me know if this is OK for you and I'll correct your second transcript too.

Regards,
Torsten

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
And then I got into a photography, moved back to West Hartford to do more with photography. And then I decided to go down to Washington D.C. and see if I could find work there.

And then I got into photography....

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
Mh, so it was in '96 and now we are in 2003 almost 2004. Eh, in the meantime we broke-up , but I stayed in Leipzig, because life is good here. No, life is good here.

Mh, so that was in '96 and now we are in 2003 almost 2004. Eh, in the meantime we broke-up , but I stayed in Leipzig, because life was good here. No, life is good here.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
When I first came to Leipzig my impression was much different, because this is only 6 years after "The Fall of the Berlin Wall". And many things did not exist, for example: ah, take-away coffee and it was very difficult to find a decent sandwich. Not all the buildings had been renovated and so it was very gray.

When I first came to Leipzig my impression was much different, because this was only 6 years after "The Fall of the Berlin Wall". And many things did not exist, for example: ah, take-away coffee or there was very difficult, it was to find a decent sandwich, not all the buildings had been renovated and so it was very grey.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
I was not used to the winters here, which were, in compares to Connecticut, not as extreme, but mostly grey. And the winters in Connecticut are typically very-very cold with, eh, with snow. And here it's not as cold, and if there is snow it lasts about 24 hours before it disappears. So, I barley find time to go to skying here, but really you can't go skying here, because there are no mountains. The best thing you can find is a hill somewhere by the sled. So you have to be real fast here in Leipzig to go sledding.

I was not used to the winters here, which were, in comparison to Connecticut, not as extreme, but mostly grey. And the winters in Connecticut are typically very-very cold with, eh, with snow. And here it's not as cold, and if there is snow it lasts about 24 hours before it disappears. So, I rarley find time to go to skying here, but really you can't go skying here, because there are no mountains. The best thing you can find is a hill somewhere and find a sled. So you have to be real fast here in Leipzig to go sledding.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
Well, I came to Germany I worked as a photographer, I worked measuring apartments - anything I could do to basically survive. I moved loans, I helped edit texts. And then I finally started teaching English. My first teaching experience in English was very difficult, because I didn't quite understand all the concept of English. I mean I may have studied it in college, but learning how it works and trying to teach it are two different things. So I had to relearn how English worked for me to teach it. Also when I arrived I had to learn German. And so learning German and teching English.

Well, I came to Germany I worked as a photographer, I worked measuring apartments - anything I could do to basically survive. I mowed lawns, I helped edit texts. And then I finally started teaching English. My first teaching experience in English was very difficult, because I didn't quite understand all the concept of English. I mean I may have studied in college, but learning how it works and trying to teach it are two different things. So I had to relearn how English worked for me to teach it. Also when I arrived I had to learn German. And so learning German and teching English.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
Well, learning German helped me teach English, because when I understood how people learn languages. So, although I have been here for 6 years or 7 years my German is not as good as it could be. Although I can read newspapers and texts and understand them fully I still haven't quite managed to speak like a German. Germans sitten to have a way of using their words, which no... no foreigner could quite master. You have to be German to master German, I think. But it's a fun language: it's more precise than English, it's got many more expressions and dialects are fun to listen to.

Well, learning German helped me teach English, because then I understood how people learn languages. So, although I've been here for 6 years or 7 years my German is not as good as it could be. Although I can read newspapers and texts and understand them fully I still haven't quite managed to speak like a German. Germans tend to have a way of using their words, which no... no foreigner could quite master. You have to be German to master German, I think. But it's a fun language: it's more precise than English, it's got many more expressions and dialects are fun to listen to.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
I have a lot contact to the local people here in Leipzig. May be because I do teach them. And a lot of my students invite me out to coffee. Or we have advance at night staying up to, which I go out myself. There are a lots of foreigners here, I can meet up with them. There are plenty of foreign round tables for people willing to learn different languages, or for people willing to learn German or English. And so through that I can meet lots of people. And helped me met lots of people.

I have a lot contact to the local people here in Leipzig. Mainly because I do teach them. And a lot of my students invite me out to coffee. Or we have events at night which they invite my out to, or which I go out myself. There are also lots of foreigners here, I can meet up with them. There are plenty of foreign round tables for people willing to learn different languages, or for people willing to learn German or English. And so through that I can meet lots of people. And it helped me meeting lots of people.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
Most of my friends are either Germans or Americans. I have two very good American friends, the rest of them are German. So I spend most of my time going back and though between English and German. Eh, and I am in fact studying German again privately, so that I can prove it. Because after 7 years, eh, there are many things which you can learn to help you speak better, pronunciation mostly and important the idioms.

Most of my friends are either Germans or Americans. I have two very good American friends, the rest are all German. So I spend most of my time going back and forth between English and German. Eh, and I am in fact studying German again privately, so that I can prove it. Because after 7 years, eh, there are many things which you can learn to help you speak better, pronunciation and mostly and more importantly the idioms.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
I go back about twice a year to America to visit my father, who lives in Connecticut, or to my mother, who lives in South Carolina. I typically go back in the summer around June for a family gathering, which is about 30 people and we rent about 4 cottages on a lake. And we all get together and basically go from one cottage to another eating all way for the two weeks. And that's a lot of fun.

I go back about twice a year to America to visit my father, who lives in Connecticut, or to my mother, who lives in South Carolina. I typically go back in the summer around June for a family gathering, which is about 30 people and we rent about 4 cottages on a lake. And we all get together and basically go from one cottage to another eating our way for two weeks. And that's a lot of fun.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
And when I visit my mother, and she lives in South Carolina in the place called Murtle Beach. Eh, there is really not much to do there: you could go mini - shogolfitting or you could go swimming at the beach. But mostly we hang out, we talk.

Back in Connecticut I still have my friends and I still meet-up with my friends. They meet at the coffee-shop in the centre of West Hartford at 2 o'clock for coffee. They been doing this since 1993. And so when I go back I still know everyone and it is fun. I get my free cup of coffee, because they never see me and the people, who work there, still know me. And they brining up the dates as towards been going on. It's a lot of fun.

And when I visit my mother, and she lives in South Carolina in the place called Murtle Beach. Eh, there is really not much to do there: you could go mini - shogolfitting or you could go swimming at the beach. But mostly we hang out, we talk.

Back in Connecticut I still have my friends and I still meet-up with my friends. They meet at the coffee-shop in the centre of West Hartford at 2 o'clock for coffee. They been doing this since 1993. And so when I go back I still know everyone and it is fun. I get my free cup of coffee, because they never see me and the people, who work there, still know me. And they bring me up to date as to what's been going on. It's a lot of fun.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
My language has changed since I been here. Many people who are American would talk to me very slowly and would tell me that my English is very strange, oh, but nice. And I say, "That's nice". And they say, "Where are you from?". and I say, "Well, I am from Connecticut". And they go, "Really?!". And I go, "Yes, really". And they go, "Where is your accent?" And I go, "Well, you can't go around with your accent all your life, if you live somewhere outs. You have to loose it."

And when you teach English You can't teach accents, you have to teach general English, which people can understand. And so I've tried to change my English a little bit, so that people could understand me better. Because when I talk real fast .... And... Well, we'll see when I go back to Connecticut I will talk like a normal Connecticut person. Which will be hard "a:"s, "o"s don't exist. It's not [ko'nektiket], but [ke'nektiket]. And it's not [prog'res], but [prag'res]. So, there is a very distinct "New England" accent. One can heir if once listens to my voice. But... it's mostly , it's mostly talked away.

My language has changed since I've been here. Many people who are American will talk to me very slowly and will tell me that my English is very strange, oh, but nice. And I say, "That's nice". And they say, "Where're you from?". and I say, "Well, I am from Connecticut". And they go, "Really?!". And I go, "Yes, really". And they go, "Where's your accent?" And I go, "Well, you can't go around with an accent all your life, if you live somewhere else. You have to lose it."

And when you teach English, you can't teach accents, you have to teach a general English which people can understand. And so I've tried to change my English a little bit, so that people can understand me better. Because when I talk real fast .... And... Well, we'll see it when I go back to Connecticut. After a month in Connecticut I will talk like a normal Connecticut person. Which will be hard "r's", "o"s don't exist. It's not [ko'nektiket], but [ke'nektiket]. And it's not [prog'res], but [prag'res]. So, there is a very very distinct "New England" accent. One can hear it if once listens to my voice. But... it's mostly, it's mostly tugged away.

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
So among other things my accent has changed as well as my vocabulary. When you talk to an American, who has been living or anybody, who has been living in Leipzig for a long time. Certain words were suddenly falling into your vocabulary, for example "_____" instead of street car or tram. And we would talk about going to that "_________", which is a train station. Or to the "______", which is the Immigration Office. And so we will do... we will use those worlds like "____" for cabinet, or "_____" or "_____" for plate and table. And we will mix and we call this new language Genglish.

And everybody, everyone doesn't matter from what country will mix. And it's very difficult when I go back to The States not to mix. Because I know and I have to keep telling myself, that no-one there understands German. So I can't go mixing like I can do in Germany in Leipzig.

I find it amazing how Germans can express themselves to such a detail. They know exactly what's going on. I just.. I am completely amazed by that. When you ask someone about how a car works and they will tell you, and they will tell you how the car slides and the reasons why the car will slide on the ace or ________ . Or the will give you details which an American person would not do. They would use a lots of ands and ehs and things like that.

And German would tell you to the exact detail what it is. Or they would take kind a head off - they don't know. But... So, It's been quite a learning experience from a technical perspective. So...

Listen to Raymond Romanos

So among other things my accent has changed as well as my vocabulary. When you talk to an American, who has been living or anybody, who has been living in Leipzig for a long time, certain words will suddenly fall into your vocabulary, for example everyone will say 'Strassenbahn' or 'Shrassenbahn' instead of street car or tram. And we will talk about going to that 'Bahnhof', which is the train station or to the 'Ausländerbehördeamt', which is the Immigrations Office. And so we will do... we will use these among other things like "Schrank" for cabinet, or "Teller" or "Tisch" for plate and table. And we will mix and we call this new language Genglish.

And everybody, everyone doesn't matter from what country will mix. And that very difficult when I go back to The States not to mix. Because I know and I have to keep telling myself, that no-one there understands German. So I can't go mixing like I can do in Germany in Leipzig.

I find it amazing how Germans can express themselves to such a detail. They know exactly what's going on. I just.. I am completely amazed by that. When you ask someone about how a car works and they will tell you, and they will tell you how the car slides and the reasons why the car will slide on the ice or hydroplane. Or the will give you details which an American person would not do. They would use lots of ands and ehs and things like that.

But a German would tell you to the exact detail what it is. Or they would say 'Keine Ahnung!' they don't know but so But... So, It's been quite a learning experience from a technical standpoint. So...
Rromanos
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 17 Jun 2004
Posts: 20
Location: Germany

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #23 (permalink) Sat Feb 07, 2009 17:30 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Svitlana_Morokhovych wrote:
Hi.
I really liked the audio recording.
I am not that good in spelling, so I had some difficulties writing it down. I didn't understand some parts, but I stll tried to write them. A real problem for me were German words, because I don't know German.
I hope you will help me to improve my English.

Here is the rest of Raymond's story:

Listen to Raymond Romanos

...and I was a cook for cowboys. And then I got into a photography, moved back to West Hartford to do more with photography. And then I decided to go down to Washington D.C. and see if I could find work there.

Meanwhile I had met a... a German girl in West Hartford, Connecticut, and we kept in contact. Eh, when I moved down to Virginia, which was near Washington, she had moved back to Germany. And I didn't like Virginia as much as I thought I would. And she had mentioned that I should come and visit her in Germany and so, I did. And this was back in 1996. So when I came to Germany I had no plans to stay for a long time. So my original plan was to be with her and to learn German and to see Germany. Mh, so it was in '96 and now we are in 2003 almost 2004. Eh, in the meantime we broke-up , but I stayed in Leipzig, because life is good here. No, life is good here.

When I first came to Leipzig my impression was much different, because this is only 6 years after "The Fall of the Berlin Wall". And many things did not exist, for example: ah, take-away coffee or it was was very difficult to find a decent sandwich. Not all the buildings had been renovated and so it was very gray.

I was not used to the winters here, which were, in comparison to Connecticut, not as extreme, but mostly gray. And the winters in Connecticut are typically very-very cold with, eh, with snow. And here it's not as cold, and if there is snow it lasts about 24 hours before it disappears. So, I barely find time to go to skiing here, but really you can't go skiing here, because there are no mountains. The best thing you can find is a hill somewhere and take a sled. So you have to be real fast here in Leipzig to go sledding.

Well, I came to Germany I worked as a photographer, I worked measuring apartments - anything I could do to basically survive. I mowed lawns, I helped edit texts. And then I finally started teaching English. My first teaching experience in English was very difficult because I didn't quite understand all the concepts of English. I mean, I may have studied it in college, but learning how it works and trying to teach it are two different things. So I had to relearn how English worked for me to teach it. Also when I arrived I had to learn German. And so learning German and teaching English.

Well, learning German helped me teach English because then I understood how people learn languages. So, although I've been here for 6 years or 7 years my German is not as good as it could be. Although I can read newspapers and texts and understand them fully I still haven't quite managed to speak like a German. Germans seem to have a way of using their words, which no... no foreigner could quite master. You have to be German to master German, I think. But it's a fun language: it's more precise than English, it's got many more expressions and dialects are fun to listen to.

I have a lot contact to the local people here in Leipzig. Mainly because I do teach them. And a lot of my students invite me out to coffee. Or we have events at night, which they invite me out to, or which I go out myself. There are a lots of foreigners here, I can meet up with them. There are plenty of foreign round tables for people willing to learn different languages, or for people willing to learn German or English. And so through that I can meet lots of people. And helped me meet lots of people.

Most of my friends are either Germans or Americans. I have two very good American friends, the rest of them are German. So I spend most of my time going back and forth between English and German. Um, and I am in fact studying German again privately, so that I can prove it. Because after 7 years, ah, there are many things which you can learn to help you speak better, pronunciation mostly and more importantly the idioms.

I go back about twice a year to America to visit my father, who lives in Connecticut, or to my mother, who lives in South Carolina. I typically go back in the summer around June for a family gathering, which is about 30 people and we rent about 4 cottages on a lake. And we all get together and basically go from one cottage to another eating all day for the two weeks. And that's a lot of fun.

And when I visit my mother, and she lives in South Carolina in the place called Myrtle Beach. Eh, there is really not much to do there: you could go mini-golfing or you could go swimming at the beach. But mostly we hang out, we talk.

Back in Connecticut I still have my friends and I still meet-up with my friends. They meet at the coffee-shop in the center of West Hartford at 2 o'clock for coffee. They've been doing this since 1993. And so when I go back I still know everyone and it is fun. I get my free cup of coffee, because they never see me and the people, who work there, still know me. And they bring me up to date as to whats been going on. It's a lot of fun.

My language has changed since I been here. Many people who are American will talk to me very slowly and would tell me that my English is very strange, oh, but nice. And I say, "That's nice". And they say, "Where are you from?". and I say, "Well, I am from Connecticut". And they go, "Really?!". And I go, "Yes, really". And they go, "Where is your accent?" And I go, "Well, you can't go around with an accent all your life, if you live somewhere else. You have to lose it."

And when you teach English, you can't teach accents, you have to teach a general English, which people can understand. And so I've tried to change my English a little bit, so that people could understand me better. Because when I talk real fast .... And... Well, we'll see when I go back to Connecticut I will talk like a normal Connecticut person. Which will be hard "r's", "o"s don't exist. It's not [ko'nektiket], but [ke'neddike']. And it's not [prog'res], but [prag'res]. So, there is a very distinct "New England" accent. One can hear it if one listens to my voice. But... it's mostly , it's mostly tucked away.

So among other things, my accent has changed as well as my vocabulary. When you talk to an American who has been living or anybody who has been living in Leipzig for a long time, certain words will suddenly fall into your vocabulary, for example "Strassenbahn" instead of street car or tram. And we would talk about going to that "Bahnhof", which is a train station. Or to the "Ausländerbehördeamt", which is the Immigrations Office. And so we will do... we will use those words like "Schrank" for cabinet, or "Teller" or "Tisch" for plate and table. And we will mix and we call this new language G'english.

And everybody, and it doesn't matter from what country, will mix. And it's very difficult when I go back to The States not to mix. Because I know and I have to keep telling myself, that no-one there understands German. So I can't go mixing like I can do in Germany, in Leipzig.

I find it amazing how Germans can express themselves to such a detail. They know exactly what's going on. I just.. I am completely amazed by that. When you ask someone about how a car works and they will tell you, and they will tell you how the car slides and the reasons why the car will slide on the ice, or hydroplane. Or they will give you details which an American person would not do. They would use lots of "ands" and "ahs" and things like that.
But a German would tell you to the exact detail what it is. Or they would say, 'Keine Ahnung!' - they don't know. But... So, It's been quite a learning experience from a technical standpoint. So...

Listen to Raymond Romanos
Rromanos
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 17 Jun 2004
Posts: 20
Location: Germany

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #24 (permalink) Sat Mar 21, 2009 11:24 am   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Hi everyone,

Here is the transcript about what I understood from the recording. And he is very talkative lol and I can't speak German and I'm not sure about the spelling of 'Lipszyc'.

... And I was a cook for cowboys - and then I got into photography, moved back to West Hartford to do more with photography and then I decided to go down to Washington D.C. to see if I could find work there. Meanwhile I had met a German girl in West Hartford Connecticut whom I kept contact.
When I moved down to Virginia, which was near Washington, she went back to Germany.

I didn't like Virginia as much that I thought I would, and she had mentionned to come and visit her in Germany and so I did. And that was back in 1996. So, when I came in Germany, I had no plans to stay for a long time but no plans not to stay for a long time. So my original plan was to be with her and to learn German and to see Germany.
So that was in 1996 and now we're in 2003, almost 2004.

In the meantime we broke up but I'd stay in Lipszyc because life was great here - no- life is great here but when I first came to Lipszyc my impression was much different because this is only 6 years after ' The fall of the Berlin wall' and many things (didn't) exist. For example, take-away coffee or it was very very difficult to find a decent sandwich. Not all the buildings had be renovated and so it was very grey. I was not used to the winters here which were- in comparaison to Connecticut- not as extreme but mostly grey. And the winters in the Connecticut are, typically, very very cold with snow and there it's not as cold and if there is snow it lasts about 24 hours before it disappears. I rarely find time to go skiing here but really can't go skiing here because there are no mountains. The best thing you can find is a hill somewhere, find a slide so you have to be really fast here, in Lipszyc, to go sliding.

When I came in Germany I worked as a photographer. I worked measuring appartments, anything I could do to basically survive. I helped edit texts and then finally I started teaching English. My first teaching experience in English was very difficult because I didn't quite understand all the concepts of English. I mean I may have studied it in College, but, learning how it works and trying to teach it are too different things. So, I had to relearn how English worked for me, to teach it. Also when I arrived, I had to learn German and so learning German and teaching English and so learning German helped me to teach English because, then, I understood how people learn languages.

Although I 've been there for 6 years or seven years, my German is not as good as it could be. Although I can read newspapers and texts and understand them fully, I still haven't quite managed to speak like a German. Germans ____ tend to have a way of using their words which no foreigners could quite master. You have to be German to master German, I think. But it's a fun language, it's more precise than English. It's got many more expressions and dialects are fun to listen to. I have a lof of contact to the local people here in Lipszyc. Many, because I do teach them and a lot of my students invit me out to coffee or we have ______ at night ____ to invit me out too. ______
There are also a lot of foreigners here, I like mid up with them. There are plenty of foreing (rent) people for people learning different languages or for people to learn German or English.
Through that, I can meet loads of people and had met loads of people.

Most of my friends are either Germans or Americans. I have two very good American friends and the rest are all German. So I spend most of my time going back and forth between English and German. And I'm, in fact, studying German again (prively) so that I can improve it. Because after seven years, there are many things which you can learn to help you speak better, pronunciation and mostly and more importantly idioms.

I go back about twice a year to America to visit my father who lives in Connecticut or to my mother who lives in South Carolina. I typically go back in the summer or in June for a family gathering which is about thirty people and we rent about four (cabanes) on the lake. We are together and basically go to one (college) to another, eating away for 2 weeks and that's a lot of fun. When I visit my mother - she lives in South Carolina in a place called Myrtle beach - there's really not much to do there. You could go _____ for golfing or you could go swimming at the beach. But mostly, we hang out and we talk.

Back in Connecticut, I still have my friends and they still ____ my friends. They meet at the coffee shop in the center of West Hartford at 2 o'clock for coffee. They've been doing this since 1993. And so, when I go back, I still know everyboy, everyone, and it's just fun. I get my free cup of coffee because they never see me, and the people who work there still know me. And they bring me up the date what's going on. It's a lof of fun.

My language has changed since I've been here. Many people, who are American, would talk to me very slowly, would tell me that my English is very strange but nice. And I say:'That's nice'! And they'd say:'Where are you from?' And I'd say: 'Well, I'm from Connecticut'. And they go:'Really?' And I go:'Yes! Really!' And they go:'Where's your accent?' And I go: 'Well, you can't walk around with an accent all your life. If you live somewhere else you have to lose it.'

And when you teach English you can't teach accent. You have to teach general English which people could understand. And so I've tried to change my English a little bit so that people could understand me better. Because, when I talk too fast _________. When I go back to Connecticut- after a month in Connecticut- I will talk like a normal Connecticut person which should be hard 'r's, 'o's don't exist, it's not 'Kennecticut' but 'Kenneccut', it's not 'progress' but 'pragress'. So there is very very distinct New England accent which one can hear if one listen to my voice but it's mostly (talk away).

So among other things, my accent has changed as well as my vocabulary. When you talk to an American, who has been living - or anybody who has been leaving in Lipszyc for a long time- certain words would certainly fall into your vocabulary. For example '_______' '______' or tram and we would talk about going to the ______ which is the train station or the '__________' which is the immigration's office. So we would use the words among other things like '________' for cabinet or '______' for plate and table and we would mix and we would call this new language 'Genglish'. And everybody, everyone - doesn't matter from what country - we'd mix and it's very difficult when I go back to the States not to mix, because I know - and I have to keep telling myself that noone there understand German - so, I can't go mixing like I can do in Germany, in Lipszyc.

I find it amazing how Germans can express themselves. With such details then you know exactly what's going on. I ___ just ____ I'm completely amazed bu that. You ask someone about how a car works and they will tell you how a car slides and the reasons why a car would slide on the ice or a (powdered place). They will give you details which an American person would not do.....

I've stopped there because I felt tired lol
Ellea
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 25 Jul 2008
Posts: 11
Location: France

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #25 (permalink) Sat Mar 21, 2009 12:23 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Oh my!! The Cockney accent is way more difficult to understand than the previous one which was American.

I've been here mostly two and a half years and I feel like I've just started to discover the best parts. For fashion as sometimes I've worked as an English teacher or in the summer I've done some other things. I breed dogs, I have two dogs, one of which is commonly England. I have a young _______ has been living in summer and training every day. Although _______________ former history countries, Germany ______________________________tend to London very popular in the City at the moment. And ________________________again before the end of this year.

There're lots of differences between London and Leipzig but also many similarities. I do think that people here are very friendly. Part cause it's the capital city the people don't have so much time in London.
Here in Leipzig, they're very friendly and _____ a lot of time for you. People are_very opened-mind, I found_______ more so ______________ being in London.

The architect also is very different, very _____________________________________. The ______ also are very fun _______ four different seasons, obviously, and a very hot Summer eh? _________hard
Winter also very distinct, also Spring too.

In England we do tend to have very long Autumns and Springs and a very short Summer and Winter.

More difficult for me !
Ellea
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 25 Jul 2008
Posts: 11
Location: France

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #26 (permalink) Sat Mar 21, 2009 17:23 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Germans set tend to have a way of using their words which no foreigner could quite master.
When I came to Germany I worked as a photographer, I worked measuring apartments, anything I could to basically survive, I mood lounds helped edit texts and then finally I started teaching English
You ask someone about how a car works and they'll tell you how a car slides and the reasons why a car slides on the ice or PLANNING they'll give you details which an American person would not do.

I'm not ends with the works still.

I had heard the track at least trhee times to makes up finally.
Carlos Henrique
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 19
Location: Brasil

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #27 (permalink) Tue Mar 24, 2009 20:47 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

I moved to Wyoming where I was working as cooker for cowboys .Well After I moved to as work photographer then i moved back to washington , but the work them was bad. Then my german girl was in Connecticut and we keep contact the I go down to Virginia ,but I did not like to Virginia whe she had to shut to the germany and , I did it was in 1996 and I did I 'have no plans to stay here for a long time , but not plans for not stay here for a long time .And I do see Germany (?)and now are 1996 and till 2000 and 2004,in the meantime We go up to the Leipzig and it was like a good idea. Well the first kind from the Leipzig is much different, because since six years after here,they follow the grew well and many things about it exist for example, table with coffee or it's very difficult to find sandwich there are not gold but is very great and this the winter here wish you are in Connecticut but did most the grave , very very cold without it's snow, but here is cold the here lasts twenty-four hours it disappears I really find time to my skin because the health is findWe go fast . Well I here in germany my girl as a photographer andbut majoring appartmentsanything I can do to surviveI love months I helped and them finally. My first time experience as teaching english was vey dificult because I work I didn't understood my english i have has study at school and learning how workers I are different things when we learn the english is very diffrent to teach it also I had learning Germany and , so teaching english it's helped me to teach englishbecause them I don't understoodso learn languages as years .My germany as good as cookieI do read the newspapers to studyI still have like Germany . The germany settled no way theywhich no, no full quickly master German to master German . But it's a fun language it's here I stay in are expressions and dialets to listen too.I have a long contact with the logo with the people here in Leipzig because i do teach them and a lot of my studies I took in a coffeeor We have advanced or throughout myself many forum wine tables when the people ones tell many languages ,so if you about . Most of myines friends are Germans or Americans are two very good americans friends and the rest all Germans.So, I'm expend the most of my time before learn English and Germany, and I in many of facts again cleaverly I can proved it. Beacause in seven years are many things could help You speak better could I see actions to help You with idioms I go back about twice years to América, to visit my father but to too living in Connecticit , and my mother but too living in South Carolina I typical go back in the summer amd the family was gathering she is abot thirth people comes any way togheter and basicly to eaten for two weeks It was a lot of fun and i had revisited my mother in two leaves in South Carolina at the beach it's too much do be thereto cook to the people in the balny and to cook to people in the beach . We most of the hang out and talk,back to Connecticut i stood have with my friends and I still here with my friends.
Note: A bit confuse stlll I hoe to be better in the next . Please send me more eercises lke this .They are increasing my comprehension a lot .Thanks in advance.Excuse me for mistakes.
Carlos Henrique Porto Alegre
Carlos Henrique
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 11 Sep 2008
Posts: 19
Location: Brasil

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #28 (permalink) Mon Apr 06, 2009 22:01 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Hello my Dear Torsten!

How are you?
I would like to thank you for the lessons you have already sent to me!
I am a litlle late with my studies, but I am with you yet.
Please,go on sending the lessons to me!

Thank you very much!

Obs. As soon as possible I am going to put my photograph in the forum ok?

My best regards

Sandra- Brasil
Sandra Rita Da Silva
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Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 46

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #29 (permalink) Sat Apr 11, 2009 18:59 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Hello Dear Torsten!

Thank you very much for the lessons!
I heard Raymond's recording twice and Edward's recording three times. I could understand Raymond but I coudn't Edward.
I am late with the lessons and in an more appropriate time I am going to try to transcript Raymond's recording ok?
I did the test and I learnt some things more.

My best regards

Sandra - Brasil
Sandra Rita Da Silva
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 46

Listening comprehension and spelling test? #30 (permalink) Tue Jun 02, 2009 13:51 pm   Listening comprehension and spelling test?
 

Hi there,

let me introduce myself. My name is Shakhrukh Sadullaew. I'm from Uzbekistan. First of all, many thanks to Mr. Torsten for his assistance.

Well, my question is a simple. I want to know about Listening materials to Upper-Intermediate students level. Do you have any like these materials? If yes - please let me to know about.

Yours faithfully,

Shakhrukh Sadullaew
Sh3hruh
New Member


Joined: 23 Mar 2009
Posts: 2

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