Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
secret agent; person who secretly investigates and gathers information about other people
warning
anniversary
spy
flexibility
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Nothing of note



 
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
What does the phrase 'in the open air' mean? | Difference between practise and practice
listening exercises
Message
Author
Nothing of note #1 (permalink) Fri Apr 22, 2005 9:23 am   Nothing of note
 

Test No. incompl/advan-35 "One is always going to lose...", question 10

Our poor potential buyer reads the papers, watches the television news and gets excited at the prospect of another meeting of the financiers but in the end nothing of ......... comes of it all.

(a) note
(b) notice
(c) noting
(d) noted

Test No. incompl/advan-35 "One is always going to lose...", answer 10

Our poor potential buyer reads the papers, watches the television news and gets excited at the prospect of another meeting of the financiers but in the end nothing of note comes of it all.

Correct answer: (a) note

Your answer was: incorrect
Our poor potential buyer reads the papers, watches the television news and gets excited at the prospect of another meeting of the financiers but in the end nothing of noted comes of it all.
_________________________

I don't understand
"nothing of note comes of it all"

Any synonoym? Maybe "nothing of this will happen"?
Guest






Nothing of note #2 (permalink) Fri Apr 22, 2005 9:27 am   Nothing of note
 

This means nothing of importance/significance - in other words nothig worth noting.
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 17284
Location: UK

In this story you'll learn everything about the passive voiceEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Learn how to explore English words! Subscribe to free email English course
Display posts from previous:   
What does the phrase 'in the open air' mean? | Difference between practise and practice
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on ESL EFL Forums
Meaning of "Day in day out"Difference between offensive and offendingAs-needed or as-requiredDifference between recur and repeatWhat does this idiom mean: to go to pieces?Difference between 'see about a plan' and 'see into a plan'Straight versus easyDifference between persist and insistWithout a stain on his characterQuestion tagsDifference between records and recordingsDifference between determine and decideDifference between cancel and reject

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail