Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
to receive; to obtain; to purchase; to bring; to persuade
endure
practice
get
break
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

What is the difference between delightful and delighted?



 
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Idiom 'Fair weather friend' | Meaning of "lion's share"
listening exercises
Message
Author
What is the difference between delightful and delighted? #1 (permalink) Mon Oct 13, 2008 22:17 pm   What is the difference between delightful and delighted?
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #69 "How to compliment", question 2

I can honestly say I haven't had such a ......... meal for ages.

(a) delight
(b) delighted
(c) delightful
(d) delighting

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #69 "How to compliment", answer 2

I can honestly say I haven't had such a delightful meal for ages.

Correct answer: (c) delightful

Your answer was: incorrect
I can honestly say I haven't had such a delighted meal for ages.
_________________________

What is the difference between DELIGHTFUL and DELIGHTED.
Naimi
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 18

What is the difference between delightful and delighted? #2 (permalink) Mon Oct 13, 2008 23:27 pm   What is the difference between delightful and delighted?
 

'Delightful' is an adjective, 'delighted' is the past tense of the verb 'to delight'.
_________________
Plan to be spontaneous tomorrow.
***
Did you hear they arrested the Energizer Bunny on battery charges?
***
Skrej
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 03 Jul 2008
Posts: 863
Location: Not-quite exact central USA

In this story you'll learn how to use the English articlesEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Sign up for FREE and explore English! Click to subscribe to email English course
What is the difference between delightful and delighted? #3 (permalink) Wed Jul 15, 2009 17:38 pm   What is the difference between delightful and delighted?
 

Hello, please someone help me: would I be right in writing: delightful meal, delighted meal and delighting meal? And what is the difference? I just think: delightful meal is just a meal which is delightful; delighted and delighting meal is also a meal which is delightful and has been finished, or being at talking time; Am I right?
Neil011081
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 14 Dec 2008
Posts: 17

What is the difference between delightful and delighted? #4 (permalink) Wed Jul 15, 2009 18:17 pm   What is the difference between delightful and delighted?
 

A delightful meal is the correct description of the meal.

You are delighted to have eaten such a meal.

Delighting is a nonsense of a word.
_________________
Keep it simple ... Keep it interesting.
Kitosdad
Language Coach


Joined: 04 Mar 2009
Posts: 13522
Location: ESSEN, Germany, (but English.)

What is the difference between delightful and delighted? #5 (permalink) Wed Jul 15, 2009 18:20 pm   What is the difference between delightful and delighted?
 

Thank you sir, I get it.
Neil011081
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 14 Dec 2008
Posts: 17

Display posts from previous:   
Idiom 'Fair weather friend' | Meaning of "lion's share"
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1
Latest topics on English Forums
'raise fund for the poor' or 'raise funds'?Meaning of "Lost my lunch"Meaning of "look what the ... dragged in"Use the "emotion" instead of feelingPhrasal verb "come from"Old hardware vs an hardware"to peter out" vs "to peter off"The order of adverbsMeaning of "pick on"What is beautician?What does institutional mean?meaning of colludeDifference of usage between 'of' and 'for'

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail