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Difference between 'see about a plan' and 'see into a plan'



 
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Difference between 'see about a plan' and 'see into a plan' #1 (permalink) Mon Apr 25, 2005 9:32 am   Difference between 'see about a plan' and 'see into a plan'
 

Please indicate me what is the different between "see about a plan" and "see into a plan".

Thanks in advance for your help,

Kelly
Kelly
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See about/into #2 (permalink) Mon Apr 25, 2005 10:06 am   See about/into
 

See about usually means prepare to think about something and see into is similar to look into and I can only think of one expression at the moment: see into the future, which means say what will happen next.
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