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Phrase: "Under the weather"



 
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Expression: keen on working | "don't you" vs. "haven't you"
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Phrase: "Under the weather" #1 (permalink) Mon May 09, 2005 16:41 pm   Phrase: "Under the weather"
 

Test No. errors/elem-7 "Prepositions", question 5

I'm feeling a little below the weather today and I just don't know what's wrong with me.

(a) I'm feeling
(b) below
(c) with

Test No. errors/elem-7 "Prepositions", answer 5

I'm feeling a little under the weather today and I just don't know what's wrong with me.

Correct entry: under
The error was: (b) below
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Under the weather #2 (permalink) Mon May 09, 2005 18:58 pm   Under the weather
 

Yes Kuba, if you are lacking energy or you are a bit sad, you are under the weather.

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feel #3 (permalink) Thu Aug 23, 2007 0:39 am   feel
 

There are some verb not used as -ing format:

want like belong remember need love see realize mean forget prefer hate hear believe

It is feel one of these?? (so feeling would be incorrect)

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Phrase: "Under the weather" #4 (permalink) Thu Aug 23, 2007 8:10 am   Phrase: "Under the weather"
 

Hi alumn@,

Feel is not a stative verb which means it can be used in progressive tenses. By the way, not all the verbs you have listed are completely stative -- realize, see, hate and hear can be dynamic too. As for the verb "love", I'm sure you have heard the slogan of one the biggest companies in the world? If they can use the verb in present progressive, why can't their customers?

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Phrase: "Under the weather" #5 (permalink) Thu Aug 23, 2007 12:52 pm   Phrase: "Under the weather"
 

.
Quite a few verbs which are typically thought of as stative also have dynamic meanings and usages. But even with a stative meaning, some of these verbs are also sometimes used in progressive tenses.

The test sentence could also be written as "I feel a little under the weather". The meaning of the verb feel is stative. The use of the simple present tense is correct and many grammar books will tell you that you may not use the progressive form here. However, this does not reflect common usage. It is quite common to also use the progressive form, especially in informal spoken English. I'd say there are a number of reasons that native speakers do this. In many cases, the use of the progressive with a stative verb reflects a change of state or a changing state. It may also simply emphasize the currentness of a particular state.

The appropriate use of stative verbs in progressive forms can be quite difficult for non-native speakers to learn.
.
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Phrase: "Under the weather" #6 (permalink) Thu Aug 23, 2007 13:40 pm   Phrase: "Under the weather"
 

Hi, Amy

To my astonishment I discovered the other day that want and mean cannot be used in the simple continuous tenses, but can be used in the perfect continuous tenses.

i.e.
I have been meaning to call you back all this week
I have been wanting to buy a new car since my last one broke down.

But we can't say
I am meaning to call you back
I am wanting to buy a new car

Do you agree with this point (made by Murphy)
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