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Meaning of "from the word go"



 
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Meaning of "from the word go" #1 (permalink) Sun May 15, 2005 20:37 pm   Meaning of "from the word go"
 

Test No. express/advan-14 "Word of Mouth", question 7

From the word go we could tell at the interview she was the ideal candidate for the job.

(a) Quickly
(b) Suddenly
(c) Straightaway
(d) Clearly

Test No. express/advan-14 "Word of Mouth", answer 7

Straightaway we could tell at the interview she was the ideal candidate for the job.

Correct answer: (c) Straightaway
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meaning of "from the word go"

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Straightaway #2 (permalink) Sun May 15, 2005 20:54 pm   Straightaway
 

This expression from the word go means immediately.
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Meaning of "from the word go" #3 (permalink) Wed Nov 22, 2006 5:44 am   Meaning of "from the word go"
 

Hi Alan,

I chose d) because I thought from the word go = from the begining and if it were so only d) could be the right choice. Could you explain for me why the idiom could mean immediately as well?

Thank you.
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Meaning of "from the word go" #4 (permalink) Wed Nov 22, 2006 7:40 am   Meaning of "from the word go"
 

.
D (Clearly) does not mean 'from the beginning' or 'from the word go', Haihao. Clearly means without doubt or question.

from the word go: from the start, as in 'I've had trouble with this computer from the word go'. This expression probably alludes to the start of a race, signaled by the word go. [Early 1800s] For a synonym, see 'from scratch'. (Am Heritage Dict.)

Straightaway and immediately also mean 'from the beginning' in the sense of 'directly upon the start of e.g. interview' (as here).
.
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Meaning of "from the word go" #5 (permalink) Wed Nov 22, 2006 8:04 am   Meaning of "from the word go"
 

Thank you, Mister Micawber, for your interpretation, especially the derivation of the idiom, which is always what I want to know badly.

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Meaning of "from the word go" #6 (permalink) Wed Nov 22, 2006 9:10 am   Meaning of "from the word go"
 

Hi,

Just to add another point to what has already been said by MM at the start of a race the runners in the race receive the following information: Ready, steady, go!
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