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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?



 
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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #1 (permalink) Sat Feb 14, 2009 6:32 am   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #146 "Conversations and Comprehension Test", question 10

Jane: How many people were at Brad's wedding?
Bruce: Oh, there must have been at least 150 people there. The reception hall was really big, and it was nearly full of guests. We had a great time.
Jane: That's great.
Question: How many people were at Brad's wedding? ..........

(a) Much more than 150 people
(b) About 150 people
(c) Fewer than 150 people

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #146 "Conversations and Comprehension Test", answer 10

Jane: How many people were at Brad's wedding?
Bruce: Oh, there must have been at least 150 people there. The reception hall was really big, and it was nearly full of guests. We had a great time.
Jane: That's great.
Question: How many people were at Brad's wedding? About 150 people.

Correct answer: (b) About 150 people

Your answer was: incorrect
Jane: How many people were at Brad's wedding?
Bruce: Oh, there must have been at least 150 people there. The reception hall was really big, and it was nearly full of guests. We had a great time.
Jane: That's great.
Question: How many people were at Brad's wedding? Much more than 150 people.
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Hi, I just want to ask a question.
If you say "at least 150" so doesn't it mean "(much) more than 150" ?
Yuji
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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #2 (permalink) Sat Feb 14, 2009 9:21 am   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

.
It means a minimum of 150. It could be 151 or 200.
.
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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #3 (permalink) Sat Feb 14, 2009 10:53 am   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

Thank you for your answer.
However, if you say "about 150", from what I think, it is around 150, say, 140 to 160. So the answer is not (entirely) correct?
Correct me, please, if I'm mistaken.
Yuji
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Joined: 23 Jan 2009
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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #4 (permalink) Sat Feb 14, 2009 13:58 pm   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

.
I agree that the question needs reworking. Thanks for bringing it to our attention, Yuji-san.
.
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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #5 (permalink) Sat Feb 14, 2009 15:26 pm   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

oh, arigato gozaimasu. Thank you for quick answer. I really appreciate it.
I've just noticed , by the way,that you're from Yokohama. :)
Yuji
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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #6 (permalink) Sat Feb 14, 2009 15:46 pm   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

.
Yes, I've been teaching English here for almost 20 years now. Where do you live, Yuji?
.
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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #7 (permalink) Sat Feb 14, 2009 15:48 pm   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

I live in Tokyo, very near Yokohama :)
Yuji
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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #8 (permalink) Mon Oct 25, 2010 19:57 pm   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

Is this sentence correct. I mean "more' is always used as comparative degree, but here i didn't understand.
Please explain me.
(a) Children of smokers are more affected by diseases like asthma and tuberculosis.
Iasku
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"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #9 (permalink) Mon Oct 25, 2010 22:15 pm   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

Children of smokers are more affected (than children of non-smokers).
The part in brackets is implied.
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"more" #10 (permalink) Wed Oct 27, 2010 3:23 am   "more"
 

But is that sentence is grammatically correct, as "than" part is not in the sentence.
Please explain to this.
Children of smokers are more affected by diseases like asthma and tuberculosis.
Iasku
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Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 25
Location: India

"at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"? #11 (permalink) Wed Oct 27, 2010 5:39 am   "at least 150" or "(much) more than 150"?
 

Beeesneees has already explained: The part in brackets is implied. The sentence as it stands is grammatically correct. The surrounding text will make clear exactly what 'more' is in comparison to.
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