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difference between leave and depart



 
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Surely vs. safely | Meaning of "we mustn't leave it so long next time"
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difference between leave and depart #1 (permalink) Mon Feb 16, 2009 14:04 pm   difference between leave and depart
 

Business Idiom in English, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #128 "Ways of disapproving", question 1

There is no way that I can agree to you ......... early today.

(a) submitting
(b) renouncing
(c) leaving
(d) departing

Business Idiom in English, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #128 "Ways of disapproving", answer 1

There is no way that I can agree to you leaving early today.

Correct answer: (c) leaving
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difference between leave and depart
Rsgarg1110
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difference between leave and depart #2 (permalink) Mon Feb 16, 2009 15:04 pm   difference between leave and depart
 

Hi,

'Leave' is used for both people and transport 'going away from' but 'depart' is usually reserved for transport: The train departs at 6 pm and we also have the word 'departure' as in 'departure times' and the opposite meaning 'arrival times'.

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difference between leave and depart #3 (permalink) Tue Jun 04, 2013 20:52 pm   difference between leave and depart
 

leaving early today=apart from the morning today?
thanx
Saneta
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difference between leave and depart #4 (permalink) Thu Jun 06, 2013 11:33 am   difference between leave and depart
 

Hi Saneta, I'm not sure I understand your question. Do you mean to ask if early today means early in the morning? Yes, early today means in the early morning.

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difference between leave and depart #5 (permalink) Thu Jun 06, 2013 17:37 pm   difference between leave and depart
 

ook, but speaker means that he/she doesn't want to leave early morning himself/herself or with the other speaker?

thanks
Saneta
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difference between leave and depart #6 (permalink) Thu Jun 06, 2013 20:55 pm   difference between leave and depart
 

The speaker is saying that he cannot allow the other person to leave early. (Note that there is no indication that this is morning. In fact, the most likely scenario is a worker asking his boss if he can leave work early... for example, if he can possibly finish work at 4 p.m. instead of 5:30 p.m. or similar)
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Surely vs. safely | Meaning of "we mustn't leave it so long next time"
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