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Difference between plenty of and abundant



 
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Difference between plenty of and abundant #1 (permalink) Fri Aug 26, 2005 10:37 am   Difference between plenty of and abundant
 

Test No. incompl/advan-25 "Interviews and Jobs", question 7

I think that you've chosen a very good area of work to seek employment in because I've heard that jobs are ......... there.

(a) many
(b) abundant
(c) frequent
(d) plenty

Test No. incompl/advan-25 "Interviews and Jobs", answer 7

I think that you've chosen a very good area of work to seek employment in because I've heard that jobs are abundant there.

Correct answer: (b) abundant

Your answer was: incorrect
I think that you've chosen a very good area of work to seek employment in because I've heard that jobs are plenty there.
_________________________

Why not plenty?
Doesn't plenty mean quite a lot? In my opinion, either "I've heard that jobs are quite a lot there" or "I've heard that jobs are plenty there" makes sense.

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Difference between plenty of and abundant #2 (permalink) Sat Aug 27, 2005 7:38 am   Difference between plenty of and abundant
 

.
As an adjective, plenty cannot stand in the predicate position, but is used with the preposition of as an attributive modifier:

I've heard that plenty of jobs are there.
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Difference between plenty of and abundant #3 (permalink) Wed Mar 21, 2007 9:10 am   Difference between plenty of and abundant
 

Mister Micawber wrote:
.
As an adjective, plenty cannot stand in the predicate position

Then how would you explain this:
"The gopher is very plenty on the west side of Mississippi"
or
"One pixel is plenty for pictures"
and so on...

doesnt plenty stand here in the predicate position?

thanks
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Difference between plenty of and abundant #4 (permalink) Wed Mar 21, 2007 12:35 pm   Difference between plenty of and abundant
 

.
The first is simply an error, either typographical or by the writer; it should read: The gopher is very plentiful on the west side of Mississippi.

As for the second-- One pixel is plenty for pictures-- 'plenty' here seems to me to be a pronoun (for 'plenty of pixels'), but I may be wrong. Maybe another member will express an opinion.
.
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Difference between plenty of and abundant #5 (permalink) Tue Oct 21, 2008 13:03 pm   Difference between plenty of and abundant
 

dear sir,
what does "woodchuck" mean? :D
is it an animal?
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Difference between plenty of and abundant #6 (permalink) Tue Oct 21, 2008 14:28 pm   Difference between plenty of and abundant
 

.
Yes; also called a GROUNDHOG.
.
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Difference between plenty of and abundant #7 (permalink) Tue Mar 27, 2012 20:52 pm   Difference between plenty of and abundant
 

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Hello,

Can "plenty" be an adjective?

I knew it can be:

1.pronoun:means a large amount; as many or as much you need

plenty(of)
plenty of eggs/ plenty of money/ plenty of time
"Do we need more milk? "No, there is plenty in the fridge.

2.adverb
a.) plenty more = a lot
There is plenty more paper if you need it.

b.) plenty long/plenty big enough to do sth= more than long/ more than big etc
enough( to do sth)
-The rope was plenty long enough to reach the ground.

Idiom: There are plenty more fish in the sea.= There are many other people or things that are as good as the one sb has failed to get.

3.noun= a situation in which there is a large supply food, money etc.
-We have food and drink in plenty

4.determiner(used before a noun)
plenty =a lot of
There is plenty room for all of you.

If it is adjective: plentiful or plenteous(lit) syn: abundant
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