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Titanic.



 
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The Vase. Conclusion. | The Vase. Part 4.
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Titanic. #1 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 7:23 am   Titanic.
 

"Please Son, don't make this trip."
The tears in my Mother's eyes almost convinced me not to set foot aboard that gigantic liner, but not quite. I was eighteen years of age, and I reckoned it was well past time that I struck out on my own.
Mam and Dad loved me, and I could see the worry in their faces as we stood on the dockside looking up at the "Titanic," the biggest passenger ship ever built.

"It's either this or the fishing boats, which do you think is safest Dad?"
My father looked at the floor and nodded his head in agreement. He knew that my mind was set on going to sea, no matter what the vessel.
"The boy will be OK on this ship Callie," he murmered.
"Look at the size of it. Even God couldn't sink this ship!"

His words were to be often repeated in the coming weeks.
Little did we know what God had in store for us.
This was the fateful ship that was to prove mens' weakness when faced by the might of nature.

I watched the passengers climbing the gang-plank, trying my utmost to keep my emotions and tears under control.
"Well, time I was aboard and working, I smiled at my mother's tears. Don't you worry mam, I'll send you a card as soon as we arrive at the other end."
My mother kissed and hugged me one last time, and my dad shook my hand and gripped my shoulders.
Even he, the superman that he was, was close to tears.
"C'mon Carrie," he said, and taking my mother by the arm he gently led her away.
I climbed the gang-plank, and my last sight of my parents was as they turned the corner of a huge warehouse on the dockside.

I reported to the purser and was assigned a cabin below decks.
My companion in my cabin was Chalkie White, a Liverpudlian with an accent broad enough to walk on.
"Your first trip then is it mate?," asked Chalkie.
"Aye, but not my last. I hope to spend my life at sea, maybe not always on luxury liners, but on anything that can float."
Chalkie laughed and slapped me on the back.
"Well mate, we had better get topside and start working before they realise we are skiving down here."
With that we both climbed to the deck and were given work ferrying the passengers luggage to their respective cabins.

The hours passed quickly, and it was only when I heard the sound of the huge horns that I realised we were about to cast off.

The deck was crowded with women and children.
Father's holding their children aloft to wave goodbye to loving grand-parents.
Tears and kisses being blown everywhere, and there was a sea of waving flags.

Looking back now in my old-age it is sad to think that over fifteen hundred of these happy cheering people would never see the end of this trip.
It seems impossible to imagine that number of fatalities, but it is true, and the records bear witness to these facts.

As we were towed away from our berth the shouts and cheering from the dockside crowd grew ever fainter, till at last they could be heard no more.
The tugs cast-off their tow lines and we were under our own steam.
The low rumble of the mighty engines increased as we headed out into open water.
Off we went, New York bound.

What an adventure this is going to be, or so I naively thought.

Kitos.

TITANIC. Conclusion.
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Titanic. #2 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 7:48 am   Titanic.
 

At the begining the name of Mother was Callie, then it changed to Carrie :)
I remember when Titanic got Oscar and everybody was talking about it. I don't like that movie.
Unfortunately I haven't watched the Revolutionary Road where Leonardo and Kate Winslet casted together for the second time. It's a good idea!! I should see that film.But I don't think I'll like it. I've never enjoyed Leonardo Di Caprio's and Kate Winslets's movies. Especially after "The Reader". 1/3 of the movie was just wasting of time where one idea followed that she was not able to read and write...

Anyway, thank you very much Kitos for the story. I learn new words reading your stories.

~Phoebe
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Titanic. #3 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 8:21 am   Titanic.
 

Phoebe, your observational talents are remakable. I never even noticed.
Some people called my mam Cally, Callie, Carry, Carrie.

I really have no idea where this story is going.

I just started writing it, and now I'll have to do some research to give a little more authenticity to it.

My greatest problem is that I am constantly penning three stories at the same time-LOL.
It's a habit which I can't seem to shake.
There must be a writer in there somewhere trying to get out.

I thank you for your bservations. They keep me on my toes.

Kitos.
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Titanic. #4 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 8:32 am   Titanic.
 

Hello Bill,

Another good piece, I must remark.

By the way, what meaning have you assigned to "berth"? Is it "continent"?

Thanks,

Ski
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Titanic. #5 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 8:41 am   Titanic.
 

Good morning Ski.

Berth can mean your cabin, or the point on the quay where the ship is anchored.
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Location: ESSEN, Germany, (but English.)

Titanic. #6 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 8:45 am   Titanic.
 

Thanks, Bill.

I was aware of the first definition but not of the second. Although I checked in the dictionary, it must have escaped my sight. Will keep it in mind anyway.

Have a nice day!
SkiIucK
I'm here quite often ;-)


Joined: 09 Oct 2006
Posts: 856

Titanic. #7 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:26 am   Titanic.
 

Thank you Kitos.

I never had problems with my memory, and my friends say I can mention a sentence said by them after 2 years :) But now I'm loosing this skill, may be I'm getting old :)

I understand you as a person reading 3 books at the same time :)
"Blood and Sand" by Frank Gardener- at home;
Letters of Sigmund Freud to his fiancee- on my way to work. It's in Russian;
"Maximum impact" by Jack Henderson - at work if I have free time and if you keep continuation of your story for the next day :).

~Phoebe
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Titanic. #8 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:36 am   Titanic.
 

Phoebe, you should try James Patterson for interesting stories. Very few characters and very short chapters, usually three/four pages, ideal as a "put down / go back to later"
format.

For heavier, more gripping stories I prefer to read Jeffery Deaver.

Kitos.
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Titanic. #9 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:57 am   Titanic.
 

Kitos,

Thank you for an advice.

In Baku it's difficult to find books in English. Most of books sold at booksellers are in Russian. Nowdays topograpy is getting improved in my country, but I can't enjoy translations to Turkish.

I hope I can find them online and print, I were not able to find them at bookseller.

Books I mentioned above are brought by my fiancee from the library of their office. The company where he works provides them with literature (but they are political in context) and they have support of native speakers to improve their English.

One more thing... I've never heard "aye' said before. I guess it's used in informal speach, isn't it?
Also I can't get the meaning of 'keep someone on his/her toes" :(

Thanks in advance,

Phoebe
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Titanic. #10 (permalink) Thu Aug 20, 2009 11:16 am   Titanic.
 

Aye, usually means YES.

To keep someone on their toes, is to make them ever-watchful and attentive.
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