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Who(m) does that car belong to?


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Who(m) does that car belong to? #1 (permalink) Thu Sep 08, 2005 10:00 am   Who(m) does that car belong to?
 

Test No. incompl/elem-39 "Relative Pronoun Exercises", question 1

......... does that car belong to?

(a) Who
(b) Which
(c) Whose

Test No. incompl/elem-39 "Relative Pronoun Exercises", answer 1

Who does that car belong to?

Correct answer: (a) Who
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how can ı use "belong to" with subject pronoun?

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Belong #2 (permalink) Thu Sep 08, 2005 11:18 am   Belong
 

You can say: That car belongs to me.
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Why whose is wrong? #3 (permalink) Sun Sep 02, 2007 12:08 pm   Why whose is wrong?
 

Hello Alan and company,

Why is "whose" wrong here?

Thank you very much !!
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Who does that car belong to? #4 (permalink) Sun Sep 02, 2007 15:12 pm   Who does that car belong to?
 

mehmet wrote:
how can ı use "belong to" with subject pronoun

Alan wrote:
You can say: That car belongs to me.
Isn't 'me' an object pronoun? :wink:

What about this:
"He belongs to me." :D

Mehmet, the word "whom" is dying out. Particularly when a preposition does not directly precede who/whom (as is the case in the test sentence), native speakers usually choose the word 'who' instead of 'whom'.

Jon wrote:
Why is "whose" wrong here?

The word 'whose' indicates possession, and the verb 'belong to' also indicates possession. You can use one or the other, but not both.

This is the way you would use 'whose':

Whose car is that?

That sentence means the same thing as "Who(m) does that car belong to?"
.
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Who does that car belong to? #5 (permalink) Wed Oct 08, 2008 0:15 am   Who does that car belong to?
 

Hi Alan,
When do we use 'who'? and when do we use 'whom'?

Thanks.
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Who does that car belong to? #6 (permalink) Wed Feb 18, 2009 7:12 am   Who does that car belong to?
 

Your explanation is very nice. Thanks.
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This is incorrect! #7 (permalink) Mon Apr 27, 2009 10:08 am   This is incorrect!
 

This exercise in incorrect -- that's why you are confused. It should be:

"Whom does this car belong to?" (or better yet, "To whom does this car belong?")

It belongs to him.

It's basically the same as the third sentence.

A good rule is the "mmmm" rule: If you can answer the sentence with "him(mmm)" the question word should be "whom(mmm)".

Whom are you talking to?
I'm talking to him.

Who is talking?
He is talking.
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Who(m) does that car belong to? #8 (permalink) Mon Apr 27, 2009 12:10 pm   Who(m) does that car belong to?
 

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Hi,

Well yes and all right. 'Whom' is the object of a preposition - in this case 'to'. But to use the object form at the beginning of a sentence as in the test is taking it too far. The test is meant to reflect current spoken English and to say; To whom does this car belong?/Whom does this car belong to? sounds pedantic in the extreme.

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Who(m) does that car belong to? #9 (permalink) Mon Apr 27, 2009 12:17 pm   Who(m) does that car belong to?
 

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Hi,

This pedantic stance reminds me of someone who insists on saying in answer to: Who's there? It is I - the rest of us say: It's me.

As they say the other side of the Atlantic: Have a nice day!

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ok #10 (permalink) Mon Apr 27, 2009 12:58 pm   ok
 

Ok, it was a little pedantic, and I agree that "To whom does this car belong" is going too far for ESL learners, but I find that a lot of non-native ESL teachers don't even know about "whom", let alone when to use it. I'm fine with teaching kids "spoken English" as long as it's correct English. You also wouldn't mark "She's gotta get outta here" as correct, even though it's spoken English.
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Who does that car belong to? #11 (permalink) Mon Apr 27, 2009 14:11 pm   Who does that car belong to?
 

" Yankee, the word "whom" is dying out ? " - Wrong. That is a rumour being put about by Americans.

Who said that.? Someone from Filidelfia no doubt.!!! :) :) ( Only joking. )

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Americans for Whom! #12 (permalink) Mon Apr 27, 2009 16:04 pm   Americans for Whom!
 

Hey! I am an American and I was the one advocating for "whom"! Though there are definitely Americans who either don't learn it in school or learn it and forget it, any kind of legitimate publications will look out for it. So it's definitely necessary.

And in the past few years books about grammar like "Eats, Shoots & Leaves" have become so popular, and Obama is using much better language than Bush did -- I think grammar is having a comeback!
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Americans for Whom! #13 (permalink) Wed Apr 29, 2009 11:10 am   Americans for Whom!
 

I think grammar is having a comeback!

I think it is making a comeback too. :) :)
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Double-Question Sentence! #14 (permalink) Tue Jun 28, 2011 18:54 pm   Double-Question Sentence!
 

Is this interrogative sentence acceptable, moderators?

Excuse me but shouldn't you say to whom does that car belong?

URL: http://www.english-test.net/esl/learn/english/grammar/ei039/esl-test.php
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Re: Double-Question Sentence! #15 (permalink) Tue Jun 28, 2011 22:19 pm   Re: Double-Question Sentence!
 

Yes Sir
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