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use Much instead of Many



 
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use Much instead of Many #1 (permalink) Sun Sep 11, 2005 19:34 pm   use Much instead of Many
 

Test No. incompl/inter-80 "Company Decisions", question 5

One of the indicators of success in any business is how ......... types of communication channels they use.

(a) much
(b) many
(c) lot
(d) lots

Test No. incompl/inter-80 "Company Decisions", answer 5

One of the indicators of success in any business is how many types of communication channels they use.

Correct answer: (b) many
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can much be correct?

Carollina
Carollina
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Much many #2 (permalink) Sun Sep 11, 2005 20:53 pm   Much many
 

Hi,

You would have to use many because the following noun is plural (types). Much would be used with a singular or uncountable noun.

Alan
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