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On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday?



 
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On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday? #1 (permalink) Thu Oct 22, 2009 6:50 am   On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday?
 

When referring to week days we use the preposition “on”. e.g. on Monday, on Sunday.
How about “the coming Sunday” and “next Sunday” ?
Should we use “on the coming Sunday” or “in the coming Sunday” ?
Also, “on next Sunday” or “ in next Sunday” ?

Thanks.

Nick
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On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday? #2 (permalink) Thu Oct 22, 2009 7:33 am   On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday?
 

'Next/last' does not take the preposition, but it is optional with 'coming' and with no modifier...and of course there are exceptions in some contextual structures.
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On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday? #3 (permalink) Thu Oct 22, 2009 8:05 am   On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday?
 

So, which of the following sentences is correct ?
(1) There will be a meeting in the coming Sunday.
(2) There will be a meeting on the coming Sunday.

Nick
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On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday? #4 (permalink) Thu Oct 22, 2009 9:09 am   On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday?
 

On. Only 'on' is the appropriate preposition.
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On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday? #5 (permalink) Thu Oct 22, 2009 17:14 pm   On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday?
 

Thank you Mister Micawber

Nick
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On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday? #6 (permalink) Thu Oct 22, 2009 20:56 pm   On the coming Sunday / in the coming Sunday?
 

Prepositions for Time

On is used with days:

I will see you on Monday.
The week begins on Sunday.

At is used with noon, night, midnight, and with the time of day:

My plane leaves at noon.
The movie starts at 6 p.m.

In is used with other parts of the day, with months, with years, with seasons:

He likes to read in the afternoon.
The days are long in August.
The book was published in 1999.
The flowers will bloom in spring.
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