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give someone the creeps



 
ESL Forum | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
How to say you had a big breakfast | four-≠twenty-≠something
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give someone the creeps #1 (permalink) Fri Oct 23, 2009 10:58 am   give someone the creeps
 

Hi,

please, help me find the right phrase to describe pleasant feeling, which can be given e.g. by someone's singing voice.
I was managed to find only "to give someone the creeps (or shivers)" but everywhere I looked it refers to something frightening, not pleasant.
Violino
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give someone the creeps #2 (permalink) Fri Oct 23, 2009 12:09 pm   give someone the creeps
 

In heaven, or, warm and glowing.
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give someone the creeps #3 (permalink) Fri Oct 23, 2009 12:57 pm   give someone the creeps
 

I've seen the expression "to give goosebumps" (="to cause the erection of hairs") in positive contexts quite often.
"Her singing voice gives me goosebumps!"
You can always specify "goosebumps of excitement/some-nice-feeling" to guarantee appropriateness - but I'm not sure whether this would work for "shivers" or "creeps", as these do sound negative /horror-related.

You can see an association with "excitement" in this Merriam-Webster dictionary entry.
There is also a good example in a joke by Dane Cook; in the CD "Retaliation", Disc 1, track 12 - "Dream House", you must pay attention from 2m25s (for context) to hear a clear example of "positive goosebumps" around 2m40s. (I'm not posting links due to possible copyright issues, but you can easily Google "Dane Cook"+"Dream House" and watch a clip right now).

Goosebumping cheers!
Planta
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give someone the creeps #4 (permalink) Fri Oct 23, 2009 20:38 pm   give someone the creeps
 

Planta wrote:
I've seen the expression "to give goosebumps" (="to cause the erection of hairs") in positive contexts quite often.
"Her singing voice gives me goosebumps!"
You can always specify "goosebumps of excitement/some-nice-feeling" to guarantee appropriateness

That's what I was looking for! :)
Thanks a lot!
Violino
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Joined: 23 Feb 2007
Posts: 70
Location: Poland Gdynia

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