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Near vs. nearly



 
ESL Forums | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
Idiom: loud and clear | Accommodate vs. accumulate
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Near vs. nearly #1 (permalink) Tue Oct 11, 2005 1:54 am   Near vs. nearly
 

Test No. incompl/elem-25 "On my Mobile", question 3

Not really. I'm quite ..........

(a) nearer
(b) near
(c) next
(d) nearly

Test No. incompl/elem-25 "On my Mobile", answer 3

Not really. I'm quite near.

Correct answer: (b) near
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why here use near not nearly?
cindy
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Near vs. nearly #2 (permalink) Tue Oct 11, 2005 11:41 am   Near vs. nearly
 

'
Nearly is an adverb meaning almost. There is no verb or adjective in this sentence for it to modify, and it cannot serve as a sentence adverbial.

Near is an adverb (among other parts of speech) meaning proximate. Here it is a sentence adverbial, a verb complement.

I am near = I am in the vicinity.
.
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