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'free reign' vs 'free rein'



 
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'free reign' vs 'free rein' #1 (permalink) Thu Nov 12, 2009 19:53 pm   'free reign' vs 'free rein'
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #353 "English Slang Idioms (74)", question 1

"I have to leave the office for about two hours. You have free ......... to conduct business until I get back," the boss told his assistant.

(a) will
(b) choice
(c) reign
(d) spirit

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #353 "English Slang Idioms (74)", answer 1

"I have to leave the office for about two hours. You have free reign to conduct business until I get back," the boss told his assistant.

Correct answer: (c) reign
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"Free rein" surely, as this phrase has its origins in equestrianism.

Mirlo
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'free reign' vs 'free rein' #2 (permalink) Fri Nov 13, 2009 2:58 am   'free reign' vs 'free rein'
 

I agree with you on that. The expression is "free rein".
Since "free rein" is also the expression being tested here, it really would be best if someone took the time to repair that error in the test.

.

There is also the expression "keep a tight rein on somebody/something".
And another expression with the word rein is "rein something in" -- which can be found (with the word rein correctly spelled) in this test:
http://www.english-test.net/esl/learn/english/grammar/ai443/esl-test.php

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'free reign' vs 'free rein' #3 (permalink) Sun Oct 16, 2011 14:23 pm   'free reign' vs 'free rein'
 

You're correct ... it should rein. The expression is "free rein".
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'free reign' vs 'free rein' #4 (permalink) Sun Oct 16, 2011 16:54 pm   'free reign' vs 'free rein'
 

Yes, it should be 'rein'.
Unfortunately corrections are not being picked up at the moment:
Why test errors are not being corrected.
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