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decay vs. rot



 
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decay vs. rot #1 (permalink) Mon Dec 28, 2009 23:33 pm   decay vs. rot
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #121 "Real Life: Grocery Stores (1)", question 10

The term "non-........." refers to food products that do not have to be refrigerated because these foods are not easily susceptible to decay or rot such as rice, cereals and canned vegetables.

(a) perishable
(b) personal
(c) parental
(d) proprietary

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #121 "Real Life: Grocery Stores (1)", answer 10

The term "non-perishable" refers to food products that do not have to be refrigerated because these foods are not easily susceptible to decay or rot such as rice, cereals and canned vegetables.

Correct answer: (a) perishable

Your answer was: correct
_________________________

Hi Teachers

Please kindly explain the difference between 'decay' and 'rot' and let me know if these sentences are natural:

1. Indulgence will rot/decay your integrity.
2. The decaying food was not yet rotten.
3. The rotting food was not yet completely decayed.
4. The suppressive regime was rotten to the core.
5. The suppressive regime was extremely decayed.

Thanks indeed
Ali
Aliraf62
You can meet me at english-test.net


Joined: 16 Feb 2009
Posts: 54
Location: Sweden

decay vs. rot #2 (permalink) Tue Dec 29, 2009 14:38 pm   decay vs. rot
 

Hi Ali,

1. Indulgence will rot/decay your integrity. I would suggest 'ruin' here.
2. The decaying food was not yet rotten. This just about works.
3. The rotting food was not yet completely decayed. I would say the process is first 'decay' and then 'rot'.
4. The suppressive regime was rotten to the core. This would be an acceptable use.
5. The suppressive regime was extremely decayed This doesn't work.

Both 'rot' and 'decay' suggest that something is going through a process of breaking up or deteriorating. I would suggest that 'decay' is the first step in this process and then there follows 'rot'. Generally 'rot' and 'rotten' can be used both literally and figuratively. 'Decay' is more often used literally.

Alan
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