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Revenue vs. turnover



 
ESL Forums | English Vocabulary, Grammar and Idioms
Pronunciation of some words. | Grammar Assignment
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Revenue vs. turnover #1 (permalink) Thu Nov 03, 2005 21:22 pm   Revenue vs. turnover
 

Hi, is there a difference between revenue and turnover? Also, what about earnings and income, when do we use them? As far as know all four terms mean the total returns of a business so I figure we use those terms depending on the context?
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Revenue vs. turnover #2 (permalink) Fri Nov 04, 2005 0:11 am   Revenue vs. turnover
 

Hi spearhead,

Revenue is the amount of money coming in from sales/production.

Turnover is the extent to which/the amount you are producing.

Income is usually a salary that comes to you on a regular basis from a job/position.

Earnings means the amount of money coming in which can vary and is not regular - often associated with freelance work.

Alan
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Turnover vs. revenue #3 (permalink) Fri Nov 04, 2005 13:49 pm   Turnover vs. revenue
 

Hi Alan. Thank you for your explanation. So if I understand you correctly, then the turnover is the amount/value of a company's production whearas revenue is the total amount of their sales? This means, that the turnover could be smaller than the revenue but not vice versa. Is that correct? Thank you in advance.
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Turnover/revenue #4 (permalink) Fri Nov 04, 2005 14:51 pm   Turnover/revenue
 

Hi spearhead,

Not necessarily. Revenue is income and turnover is production and so you could make or lose money.

Alan
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Turnover vs. revenue #5 (permalink) Fri Nov 04, 2005 15:58 pm   Turnover vs. revenue
 

Hi Alan, sorry to bother you again, but what about the retail sales industry. What does the term turnover mean there? They don't have any production, do they?
Spearhead
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Revenue vs. turnover #6 (permalink) Sat Nov 05, 2005 4:16 am   Revenue vs. turnover
 

.
Retail turnover is the quantity of stock sold over an indicated period, expressed either in monetary value or number of units.
.
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Revenue vs. turnover #7 (permalink) Wed Apr 16, 2008 9:03 am   Revenue vs. turnover
 

Hi ALAN, i will like to know that how turn over can be defined for BPOs.
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