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With best wishes


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With best wishes #31 (permalink) Mon Mar 28, 2011 6:50 am   With best wishes
 

Hello Alan,
Thank you very much for the article. But apart from the introduction, which is a good one, I find it difficult to relate 'Suspension of Disbelief' with the rest of the essay. Can you please make a short summary of how the term applies to the rest of the essay?
Thank you very much.

From Michael.
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With best wishes #32 (permalink) Sun May 29, 2011 19:30 pm   With best wishes
 

Hello, Alan! Many thanks for that essay. I really enjoyed reading it. Would you expain the origin of the following words from the text - "to dash off" and "to cough up"? Who and when introduce these words for the first time? Best regards. Tanya
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With best wishes #33 (permalink) Sun May 29, 2011 20:23 pm   With best wishes
 

Hi Tanya,

I can't tell you the origin of these expressions but I'll try to explain what they mean. I can't remember exactly in what context I used them and perhaps you could provide with a link. 'Dash off' can mean write something very quickly and 'cough up' can mean pay for something reluctantly.

Do they work? If not perhaps you could give me the exact context.

Alan
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With best wishes #34 (permalink) Mon May 30, 2011 6:48 am   With best wishes
 

Can we say: In the beginning we met......, In the very first days we met......? the second sentence is acceptable or not? thanks in advance.
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With best wishes #35 (permalink) Mon May 30, 2011 9:31 am   With best wishes
 

It's less usual, and would probably benefit from further information:

In the first days of this project, we met...
In the first days of this business venture, we met...
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With best wishes #36 (permalink) Mon May 30, 2011 9:31 am   With best wishes
 

Yes, both are all right. You really need to show this in a fuller sentence to see how it would be used.

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With best wishes #37 (permalink) Wed Jun 01, 2011 0:30 am   With best wishes
 

OK. Many thanks Beees and Prof. Alan.
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With best wishes #38 (permalink) Tue Nov 01, 2011 9:27 am   With best wishes
 

hello sir,
You have used 'would you' in this essay. Can we use would in the present sense, actually would is the past tense of will, can't we use will you there instead of would you ? Please reply to this soon,
with regards,
Sumesh
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With best wishes #39 (permalink) Tue Nov 01, 2011 9:43 am   With best wishes
 

Hi Sumesh,

Can you quote the example from what I have written. If you want to make a request asking someone to help you, for example, you can say: Will you help me? or Would you help me?. The second form is considered to be more polite.

Alan
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With best wishes #40 (permalink) Tue Nov 01, 2011 10:04 am   With best wishes
 

Hello sir,
of course I can quote it
"So what would you do if you were marooned (left alone on a desert island unable to escape)? Eight records wouldn't be much good, would they? A mobile phone wouldn't help either. You probably couldn't get a signal and also you wouldn't know where you were, would you? You could write a letter but then how would you send it?"
regards
sumesh
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With best wishes #41 (permalink) Tue Nov 01, 2011 11:10 am   With best wishes
 

Hi,

The use of 'would' in these sentences is used to indicate 'condition'. It is sometimes called Conditional 2 (probable) and all are dependent on 'if'. Look at these:

If you are marooned on a desert island, what will you do? Possible
If you were marooned on a desert island, what would you do? Probable
If you had been marooned on a desert island, what would you have done? Impossible

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With best wishes #42 (permalink) Wed Jun 26, 2013 20:05 pm   With best wishes
 

Dear Sir,
Good day to you. The lesson 'Best Wishes' is good but as a Lecturer in English Literature, I can't help but think of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the great Romantic Poet, who introduced this concept of 'willing suspension of disbelief'. This is now, in the modern and post-modern English world, even a trend called 'magic realism' also uses this concept.
I just wanted to share this.
Thank you,
Pratima Roy
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With best wishes #43 (permalink) Wed Jun 26, 2013 20:12 pm   With best wishes
 

Sir,
I made a syntactic error while mailing my previous mail on 'willing suspension of disbelief'. It is that in the last sentence I should have said
'"This is now, in the modern and post-modern English world, even a trend called 'magic realism' . It uses this concept. I just wanted to share this".
Thank you,
With regards,
Pratima Roy
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With best wishes #44 (permalink) Sat Aug 17, 2013 6:50 am   With best wishes
 

Hi Alan
Very informative essay! It helped me learn about origin of postal system. Such essays are good way of enhancing our word-hoard coupled with increasing our knowledge.
Ajay Nahta
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