Google
English-Test.net
Find penpals and make new friends today!
 
well-versed; proficient; skilled
rear
homebound
conversant
entitled
full quiz correct answer
 
Username
Password
 Remember me? 
Search   Album   FAQ   Memberlist   Profile   Private messages   Register   Log in 

Pain vs. hurt


Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
The meaning of "for"??? | What does "up to his ears in" mean?
listening exercises
Message
Author
Pain vs. hurt #1 (permalink) Fri Nov 25, 2005 23:28 pm   Pain vs. hurt
 

Test No. incompl/elem-21 "Remove the Spoon", question 4

Well, I get a ......... in my right eye every time I drink a cup of tea.

(a) hurt
(b) shoot
(c) feel
(d) pain

Test No. incompl/elem-21 "Remove the Spoon", answer 4

Well, I get a pain in my right eye every time I drink a cup of tea.

Correct answer: (d) pain

Your answer was: incorrect
Well, I get a hurt in my right eye every time I drink a cup of tea.
_________________________

Why is pain, not hurt
Thanks
Guest






Pain vs. hurt #2 (permalink) Sun Nov 27, 2005 7:56 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

.
In common use, pain is a single sharp and distinct feeling; hurt is an injury. I suppose it would help if you had actually gotten a pain in your eye from drinking tea or eating ice cream.
.
_________________
Native English teacher at Mister Micawber's
Mister Micawber
Language Coach


Joined: 17 Jul 2005
Posts: 13018

Want to learn about the future tenses? Read this story and smileEnglish grammar exercises — improve your English knowledge and vocabulary skillsAre you a native speaker of English? Then you should read this!Learn how to explore English words! Subscribe to free email English course
Pain vs. hurt #3 (permalink) Tue Jul 07, 2009 12:19 pm   Pain vs. hurt
 

Hello
"Pain is asingle sharp and distinctfeeling" what's mean this sentence?
Please explain what is different between pain and hurt.
Hamed
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 28 Jan 2009
Posts: 22

Pain vs. hurt #4 (permalink) Tue Jul 07, 2009 12:30 pm   Pain vs. hurt
 

Hamed. Mr.Micawber has explained.

The pain has been caused to the eye by the spoon in the cup. It is momentary. It stops when the spoon moves away from the eye.

The hurt continues long after the pain has dissipated.
_________________
Keep it simple ... Keep it interesting.
Kitosdad
Language Coach


Joined: 04 Mar 2009
Posts: 13522
Location: ESSEN, Germany, (but English.)

Pain vs. hurt #5 (permalink) Wed Jul 08, 2009 5:26 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

I have caught the difference between 'pain' and 'hurt', but why do we have the indefinite article 'a' before 'pain'? Is 'pain' countable?
Romashka
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 28 Jan 2009
Posts: 47
Location: Russia, Moscow

Pain vs. hurt #6 (permalink) Wed Jul 08, 2009 5:37 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

Is 'pain' countable?

Not normally, but one can be "in lots of pain".
_________________
Keep it simple ... Keep it interesting.
Kitosdad
Language Coach


Joined: 04 Mar 2009
Posts: 13522
Location: ESSEN, Germany, (but English.)

Pain vs. hurt #7 (permalink) Wed Jul 08, 2009 6:58 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

Very thanks for your explain Mr Kitosdad.
Hamed
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 28 Jan 2009
Posts: 22

Pain vs. hurt #8 (permalink) Wed Jul 08, 2009 8:09 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

Kitosdad wrote:
Is 'pain' countable?

Not normally, but one can be "in lots of pain".

So if pain is uncountable in general, can we say:
"Well, I get pain in my right eye every time I drink a cup of tea." (without 'a')?
Romashka
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 28 Jan 2009
Posts: 47
Location: Russia, Moscow

Pain vs. hurt #9 (permalink) Wed Jul 08, 2009 10:44 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

Hi Romashka,

Yes, you can use 'pain' without 'a' when you are talking about it in general terms. Look at this:

Charlie has a fear of heights.

Charlie experiences fear sometimes in the course of his duties.

Alan
_________________
English as a Second Language
You can read my ESL story Present Simple
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 17284
Location: UK

Pain vs. hurt #10 (permalink) Wed Jul 08, 2009 12:06 pm   Pain vs. hurt
 

Thank you, Alan.
It's a bit difficult to me to realize the distinction.. Because I thought that we don't use 'a' for abstract and uncountable nouns.
From your explanation I see that 'a fear of heights' is something between 'fear in general' and 'the fear of these heights' on a definition scale :D Am I right?

Sincerely,
Roman
Romashka
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 28 Jan 2009
Posts: 47
Location: Russia, Moscow

Pain vs. hurt #11 (permalink) Thu Aug 13, 2009 11:17 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

Hi!

I've entered this topic to ask the same question the indefinite article. It seemed a bit odd to me here.

Alan wrote:
...Yes, you can use 'pain' without 'a' when you are talking about it in general terms...

Alan, can we omit the article in this very phrase?
May I say: "Well, I get a pain in my right ankle every time I drink a liter of whiskey."... or would you consider this construction wrong? In a word, is "a" obligatory here or is it just preferable?
RussianBear
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 01 Apr 2009
Posts: 26
Location: A bit on the side, :)

Pain vs. hurt #12 (permalink) Thu Aug 13, 2009 11:34 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

Please activate Javascript in your browser to listen to this audio recording

 434 Listened
Download mp3 Click to listen

Hi RB,

Some nouns have a dual purpose. They can be looked at as something abstract or as something specific. Some examples are: pain/fear/pleasure/joy and so on as in these sentences:

She experienced a severe pain in the left side of her head.
Some people can tolerate pain for long periods

He has a fear of lifts and always walks up the stairs.
Firemen have to suppress fear when they go into a blazing building.

It is a real pleasure to see you again after all this time.
Work unfortunately often has to come before pleasure.

For older people it is a joy for them to see their grandchildren grow up.
The poet Wordsworth expresses the sense of joy he experiences at the onset of Spring.

In your sentence you can insert or omit the article before 'pain' depending how specific you consider it to be.

Alan
_________________
English as a Foreign Language
You can read my EFL story Progressive Forms
Alan
Co-founder
Alan Townend

Joined: 27 Sep 2003
Posts: 17284
Location: UK

Pain vs. hurt #13 (permalink) Sun Aug 16, 2009 15:39 pm   Pain vs. hurt
 

xie xie!! thank you Alan! =))
GraceFu
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 28 May 2009
Posts: 18
Location: Beijing, China

Pain vs. hurt #14 (permalink) Mon Aug 17, 2009 7:24 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

Hi Alan,

Thank you for the detailed explanation.
RussianBear
I'm new here and I like it ;-)


Joined: 01 Apr 2009
Posts: 26
Location: A bit on the side, :)

Pain vs. hurt #15 (permalink) Wed Sep 16, 2009 4:13 am   Pain vs. hurt
 

Hi Alan,

You explanation is very clearly. Thank a lot.
Thanh Ha
New Member


Joined: 05 May 2009
Posts: 4

Display posts from previous:   
The meaning of "for"??? | What does "up to his ears in" mean?
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests) All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2
Latest topics on English Forums
Test incompl/elem-284, User's Answer 9Which answer is right?look forward to sleeping infinance chargesIt should be "What are you doing here?"meaning of spring'What does NATO stand for' vs 'Where does NATO stand for?'Difference between why and what?Why do you use what instead of which?'do' = 'go or travel (at a certain speed)'Meaning of "make a go of things"Pain vs. hurt, page 2Don't drink and drive

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Get FREE English course via e-mail