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Idiomatically speaking


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Idiomatically speaking #1 (permalink) Wed Apr 07, 2010 12:56 pm   Idiomatically speaking
 

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Hi,

There are several ways to communicate with others and probably the best way is to speak plainly. On the other hand it's very useful to use idioms now and again as I have explained in my latest newsletter:

http://www.english-test.net/newsletter/idiomatically-speaking-188.html

Alan
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Idiomatically speaking #2 (permalink) Wed Apr 07, 2010 13:09 pm   Idiomatically speaking
 

Hi Alan,

As always, you essays are very amusing and refreshing to read. Hats off to you and your great work.

Y.I.
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Idiomatically speaking #3 (permalink) Fri Apr 09, 2010 11:31 am   Idiomatically speaking
 

Hi, Alan

Thank you very much for this intresting essay. If "brevity is the soul of wit" then idiom is the soul of language.
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Idiomatically speaking #4 (permalink) Fri Apr 16, 2010 8:51 am   Idiomatically speaking
 

Thank you Mr. Alan
you teach us alot. I take my hat off to you
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Idiomatically speaking #5 (permalink) Mon Apr 26, 2010 8:44 am   Idiomatically speaking
 

That was great essay Alan, I enjoyed reading your eloquent writing. Best wishes! Kur
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Idiomatically speaking #6 (permalink) Wed Apr 28, 2010 20:30 pm   Idiomatically speaking
 

I like English idioms very much, but they say idioms often sound offensive, like 'butter fingers' or 'bull in a china shop' and you have to be very careful. Besides there are a lot of obsolete idioms which are hardly worth being used.

The problem is how to choose just necessary ones avoiding sell-by date ones?
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Idiomatically speaking #7 (permalink) Tue Jul 06, 2010 12:31 pm   Idiomatically speaking
 

Hello Mr. Alan,

I really liked the article ' idiomatically speaking'. So, I want to know that where can one find such idioms to read and learn.

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Idiomatically speaking #8 (permalink) Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:26 am   Idiomatically speaking
 

Hi Aarubee,

There are many sites on the Internet you might find useful like this one:

http://www.idiomsite.com/

Alan
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Idiomatically speaking #9 (permalink) Fri Jul 16, 2010 19:50 pm   Idiomatically speaking
 

Sir Alan
I'm really indebted to you. Your articles enrich my English.so I write to thank you and wish you everlasting success.
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Idiomatically speaking #10 (permalink) Mon Jul 26, 2010 8:17 am   Idiomatically speaking
 

Hallo Alan
I've got some problem in Duke of Kent's text: ''Than stands on any shoulder that I see '' !
It would be very gently if you could help me.
Thanks so much
Terry
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Idiomatically speaking #11 (permalink) Mon Jul 26, 2010 8:23 am   Idiomatically speaking
 

Hi Terry,

Could you please direct me to the exact text. I have written so much material for the site that I can't immediately put my finger on every piece.

Alan
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Idiomatically speaking #12 (permalink) Mon Jul 26, 2010 15:20 pm   Idiomatically speaking
 

Hi Alan,

The phrase appears in this newsletter issue: http://www.english-test.net/newsletter/idiomatically-speaking-188.html

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Idiomatically speaking #13 (permalink) Mon Jul 26, 2010 16:37 pm   Idiomatically speaking
 

Dieter Radke wrote:
Hallo Alan
I've got some problem in Duke of Kent's text: ''Than stands on any shoulder that I see '' !
It would be very gently if you could help me.
Thanks so much
Terry

Hi terry,

What Kent is saying is that he has seen more attractive faces than he can see at the moment. He is in fact being rude and saying that he doesn't really like the look of any of the people around him at that moment.

Alan
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Question #14 (permalink) Thu Jul 29, 2010 13:11 pm   Question
 

Hello,
'butter fingers' What does it mean?
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Idiomatically speaking #15 (permalink) Thu Jul 29, 2010 13:27 pm   Idiomatically speaking
 

It is an idiom applied to a rather clumsy person who tends to drop things.

(It's as if their fingers are made of butter - soft and slippery - so that they cannot gain a proper hold on the object and it slips from their grasp.)
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