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Typical of vs. typical in



 
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Typical of vs. typical in #1 (permalink) Mon Dec 05, 2005 20:25 pm   Typical of vs. typical in
 

ESL/EFL Test "Finance", question 8

You have to accept that this kind of expenditure is quite ......... in an enterprise of this kind.

(a) general
(b) typical
(c) formal
(d) correct

ESL/EFL Test "Finance", answer 8

You have to accept that this kind of expenditure is quite typical in an enterprise of this kind.

Correct answer: (b) typical
_________________________

Hi,
As far as I know typical is used with the preposition of. Why here is in?

Deya
Deya
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Typical of vs. typical in #2 (permalink) Mon Dec 05, 2005 20:55 pm   Typical of vs. typical in
 

Hi,

The preposition here (in) is not related to the phrase in an enterpries. The sentence could also read:

You have to accept that in an enterprise of this kind this kind of expenditure is quite typical.

Alan
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