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What is the difference between gain and win?



 
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What is the difference between gain and win? #1 (permalink) Sat Dec 10, 2005 15:49 pm   What is the difference between gain and win?
 

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #102 "The Parliamentary Candidate (4)", question 5

He realized that he had to say something quickly to ......... the crowd over to his side. 'Thank you for your generous gift, but I really prefer them in sandwiches. And now let's get on with the meeting.'

(a) acquire
(b) win
(c) gain
(d) control

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #102 "The Parliamentary Candidate (4)", answer 5

He realized that he had to say something quickly to win the crowd over to his side. 'Thank you for your generous gift, but I really prefer them in sandwiches. And now let's get on with the meeting.'

Correct answer: (b) win

Your answer was: incorrect
He realized that he had to say something quickly to gain the crowd over to his side. 'Thank you for your generous gift, but I really prefer them in sandwiches. And now let's get on with the meeting.'
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Dear Alan
Can you explain to me why we have to use win here instead of the other? I mean Gain for instance

Thanks in advance for your help

Kelly
KellyT
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Gain, acquire vs win #2 (permalink) Sat Dec 10, 2005 17:57 pm   Gain, acquire vs win
 

GAIN and ACQUIRE both mean to come into possession or use of, for example gain a fortune; gain information about somebody’s plans; acquire shares of stock; acquire proficiency in something (maths, English, etc.)

WIN means to succeed in gaining the favour or support of; to gain the affection or loyalty of; to appeal to.
Her eloquence won over the audience.

Hope this helps!
Success!

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Win over #3 (permalink) Sat Dec 10, 2005 17:58 pm   Win over
 

Hi,

Win somebody over is the set expression meaning persuade someone to agree with you> Gain has often got the sense of getting things like success/profit/support.

Alan
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Gain over? #4 (permalink) Fri Nov 09, 2012 7:14 am   Gain over?
 

Hi teachers,

Alan explained use of the gain and win over. That's helpful, certainly.

I think the meaning of the test sentence is similar to the one in the next example: The new leader's popularity gained over many members of the opposing party.

Am I right?
What about gain over in the test sentence?

Thank you very much,
Vladimir.
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What is the difference between gain and win? #5 (permalink) Fri Nov 09, 2012 10:02 am   What is the difference between gain and win?
 

Hi Vladimir,

I see the point you have made but 'gain over' isn't an accepted alternative to 'win over'. 'Gain' as I said earlier is strongly routed in meaning to increasing/acquiring/achieving things like success/support/profit/weight. 'Win' in its figurative sense on the other hand has strong links with the idea of persuasion, which is how it is used in the test sentence. You might note the expression 'a winning smile', which is used to describe how someone smiles in such a way that you are attracted to them.

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A winning smile! #6 (permalink) Fri Nov 09, 2012 10:10 am   A winning smile!
 

Thanks a lot Alan!!!

The set expression a winning smile is the keyphrase for me, I haven't known it before!

Thank you once more,
Vladimir.
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