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try on vs. try out



 
ESL Forum | English Teacher Explanations (ESL Tests)
I just can't get across to her vs. get through to her | Difference between stick and adhere
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try on vs. try out #1 (permalink) Mon Jun 14, 2010 5:40 am   try on vs. try out
 

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #199 "Phrasal Verbs (T)", question 4

Leila was feeling blue, so she went shopping to ......... some new outfits.

(a) try at
(b) try on
(c) try in

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #199 "Phrasal Verbs (T)", answer 4

Leila was feeling blue, so she went shopping to try on some new outfits.

Correct answer: (b) try on
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try at
Truy
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try on vs. try out #2 (permalink) Mon Jun 14, 2010 7:36 am   try on vs. try out
 

I think you might be thinking of 'try out'. She is going to try on some clothes. (Try them on herself.)
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try on vs. try out #3 (permalink) Mon Jun 14, 2010 11:38 am   try on vs. try out
 

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Hi Truy,

As you can see, 'try on' is the choice for the test sentence because it means put the clothes on and see whether they are right for you.

'Try out' suggests that you try something as a sort of trial to see if you can manage or use it. Some car manufacturers offer you the chance to try out a car for a short time. That means you drive it for half an hour and see whether you like the car.

Alan
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try on vs. try out #4 (permalink) Tue Nov 29, 2011 14:26 pm   try on vs. try out
 

1.outfits= clothes?
2.feel blue=feel sad?

thank you
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Outfit #5 (permalink) Wed Nov 30, 2011 2:10 am   Outfit
 

Outfit = equipment, equipping
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Re: Outfit #6 (permalink) Wed Nov 30, 2011 6:47 am   Re: Outfit
 

Rinson Gultom wrote:
Outfit = equipment, equipping

Not in this context. Here 'outfit' refers to the clothes, shoes and jewellery that a person combines to wear at the same time.
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try on vs. try out #7 (permalink) Thu Dec 01, 2011 11:06 am   try on vs. try out
 

what about the meaning of 'feel blue'?

thanks
Saneta
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try on vs. try out #8 (permalink) Thu Dec 01, 2011 17:36 pm   try on vs. try out
 

You are correct.
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Mistake and error distinguished #9 (permalink) Fri Dec 02, 2011 21:01 pm   Mistake and error distinguished
 

Mistake results from inadvertence, meaning had the man doing the act been mindful, there could not be the mistake. Error is higher type of mistake which results from lack definite knowledge of the person doing the act.
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