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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.



 
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #1 (permalink) Wed Jun 16, 2010 15:26 pm   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #183 "Modal Verbs (1)", question 9

It ......... rain tomorrow. The weather forecast doesn't look good right now.

(a) have
(b) need to
(c) might
(d) could have

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #183 "Modal Verbs (1)", answer 9

It might rain tomorrow. The weather forecast doesn't look good right now.

Correct answer: (c) might

Your answer was: correct
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hi, why we are used might?

talal
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #2 (permalink) Wed Jun 16, 2010 17:56 pm   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

'Might' is used when showing that something is (or was ) possible.

In this case, it is possible that it will rain tomorrow.
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may or might? #3 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 9:49 am   may or might?
 

9.It ........ rain tomorrow. The weather forecast doesn't look good right now.

Which one is correct?
It may rain tomorrow.
Or
It might rain tomorrow.
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #4 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 10:13 am   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

I checked and there is only a choice of may - you are not given a choice of might in the test.

May is stronger, though, than might, although both imply "guessing something in the future", as in the action or event is still not certain.

So ,in my opinion, it is up to you whether to use might or may. Depends on what you want to convey.
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #5 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 11:28 am   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

@Incoan,

I think may is use with present form and might is use with past action.
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #6 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 11:50 am   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

Not necessarily. I agree with Incoan that "may" is a stronger form of "might."
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #7 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 12:00 pm   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

Thanks Atomos, Incoan for halping me to understand about may and might.
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #8 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 19:00 pm   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

As a learner, I'd say,

'It might rain tomorrow.', and never, 'It may rain tomorrow.'
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #9 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 19:41 pm   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

Either is correct, E2, though your structure is far more common.
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #10 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 20:52 pm   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

Hi E2e4
,

Why do you say you would never say:
Quote:
' It may rain tomorrow.'


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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #11 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 21:30 pm   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

Alan wrote:
Hi E2e4
Why do you say you would never say:
Quote:
' It may rain tomorrow.'
Alan

Try as might, I wasn't not able to answer in English.
Let me try to describe it.

May I ask you a question!
Yes, you may! (permission)

Yeah, I use "may" for permission.

Sounds to me like the rain had needed my permission to drop down the earth if I said, It may rain tomorrow.'
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #12 (permalink) Wed Feb 02, 2011 23:20 pm   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

You mean it sounds as if it is it is equivalent you "you may..." /"I give you permission..."

'May' can be used to express a possibility (it may rain) as well as express permission (you may leave now). It can also be used to express a hope/desire (he may win) or used before a more important point to admit that something is the case ( constant practice may seem boring but it is the route to improvement).
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Phrase: It might rain tomorrow. #13 (permalink) Thu Feb 03, 2011 9:27 am   Phrase: It might rain tomorrow.
 

Hi E2e4,

You are quite right to say that 'may' is used as a polite form in requests. The main difference (though slight) between the modals 'may' and might' suggesting what is likely to happen is really a question of perspective. 'Might' makes the statement more tentative and the possibility more remote.

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